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Concluding Remarks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2023

Wolfgang Schnotz
Affiliation:
University of Koblenz-Landau
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Summary

In future, an increasing number of people will need to learn continuously in order to orient themselves in the quickly changing world around them. Multimedia communication and multimedia comprehension will be key elements of their learning. Accordingly, it is very important to have a sufficiently deep understanding of the psychological processes behind multimedia comprehension. This understanding should be rooted in theory-driven empirical research about the cognitive processing of multiple representations, particularly of texts and pictures. It should also allow practice-oriented basic recommendations to be derived for the design and usage of multimedia. These recommendations should go beyond everyday knowledge, practical experience, intuition, and the use of seemingly professional surface features. Design of multimedia communication has to be based on sufficiently deep knowledge about the psychological processes involved in comprehension and knowledge construction. Practitioners need to receive scientific support for them to better understand the laws of perception and cognitive processing underlying comprehension and knowledge acquisition.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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  • Concluding Remarks
  • Wolfgang Schnotz, University of Koblenz-Landau
  • Book: Multimedia Comprehension
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009303255.011
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  • Concluding Remarks
  • Wolfgang Schnotz, University of Koblenz-Landau
  • Book: Multimedia Comprehension
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009303255.011
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Concluding Remarks
  • Wolfgang Schnotz, University of Koblenz-Landau
  • Book: Multimedia Comprehension
  • Online publication: 16 February 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009303255.011
Available formats
×