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6 - Strategic operations management in services

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Alan Nankervis
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
Yuki Miyamoto
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
Ruth Taylor
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
John Milton-Smith
Affiliation:
Curtin University of Technology, Perth
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Summary

Learning objectives

After studying this chapter, readers will be able to:

  • discuss the nature, scope and significance of operations management within services

  • define the concept of operations management and explain its various functions and dimensions

  • explain a variety of operations management concepts and theories

  • discuss the main issues and challenges associated with managing the operations of services.

Introduction

The previous chapters have presented the nature and scope of the strategic management of services. The two interdependent, but discrete, domains of management – the corporate (or strategic) domain, and the functional (or operational) domain – are both needed for the management of organisational efficiency and effectiveness, and hence survival. The special vulnerability to external pressures and influences when managing services (as discussed in Chapters 2 and 3) makes strategic management especially important (as discussed in Chapters 4 and 5). However, the management of the service delivery process (a significant component of the service ‘product’) is of equal importance. This chapter will provide an overview of services operations management in a cross-functional management context. This integrated approach to the management of services will examine the issues and challenges significant for those dealing with operations management.

The functional management domain, as discussed in Chapter 1, presents the concept of management of an organisation's marketing, operations, finances, and human resources as being significant for organisations involved in services.

Type
Chapter
Information
Managing Services , pp. 203 - 251
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

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