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18 - Pronunciation and Good Language Teachers

from Part III - Instructional Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2020

Carol Griffiths
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Zia Tajeddin
Affiliation:
Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
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Summary

Chapter 18 first identifies the theoretical framework and key components of a pronunciation learning approach. It then shares the results of a small-scale study that investigated the efficacy of the approach in a tutoring setting. The results provided empirical evidence supporting the approach and revealed seven factors that contributed to changes in the tutors’ perceptions of their expert knowledge, agency, and professional identity as pronunciation teachers.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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