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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2018

Kelly Sorensen
Affiliation:
Ursinus College, Pennsylvania
Diane Williamson
Affiliation:
Syracuse University, New York
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  • Bibliography
  • Edited by Kelly Sorensen, Ursinus College, Pennsylvania, Diane Williamson, Syracuse University, New York
  • Book: Kant and the Faculty of Feeling
  • Online publication: 01 March 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316823453.015
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  • Bibliography
  • Edited by Kelly Sorensen, Ursinus College, Pennsylvania, Diane Williamson, Syracuse University, New York
  • Book: Kant and the Faculty of Feeling
  • Online publication: 01 March 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316823453.015
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  • Bibliography
  • Edited by Kelly Sorensen, Ursinus College, Pennsylvania, Diane Williamson, Syracuse University, New York
  • Book: Kant and the Faculty of Feeling
  • Online publication: 01 March 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316823453.015
Available formats
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