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9 - Substance Use Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2021

Audrey Walker
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Steven Schlozman
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Jonathan Alpert
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
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Summary

Substance use disorders are highly prevalent, affecting millions of Americans directly (social, occupational, and health problems) and indirectly (billions of dollars in health care costs and lost revenues due to disability). This section briefly introduces the chemical classification and neurobehavioral properties of the most commonly misused substances.

Type
Chapter
Information
Introduction to Psychiatry
Preclinical Foundations and Clinical Essentials
, pp. 179 - 232
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Galanter, M., and Kleber, H. D. (eds.) (2015). The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment, 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.Google Scholar
Miller, W. R., and Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change (Applications of Motivational Interviewing), 3rd ed. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Anton, R. F., O’Malley, S. S., Ciraulo, D. A., Cisler, R. A., Couper, D., and the COMBINE Work Group (2006). Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence: The COMBINE Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA, 295 (17), 20032017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anton, R. F., Oroszi, G., O’Malley, S., Couper, D., Swift, R., Pettinati, H., and Goldman, D. (2008). An Evaluation of Mu-Opioid Receptor (OPRM1) as a Predictor of Naltrexone Response in the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: Results from the Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence (COMBINE) Study. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 65 (2), 135144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carliner, H., Keyes, K., and McLaughlin, K. (2016). Childhood Trauma and Illicit Drug Use in Adolescence: A Population-Based National Comorbidity Survey Replication-Adolescent Supplement Study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 55 (8), 701708.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fudala, P. J., Bridge, T. P., Herbert, S., Williford, W. O., Chiang, C. N., and the Buprenorphine/Naloxone Collaborative Group (2003). Office-Based Treatment of Opiate Addiction with a Sublingual-Tablet Formulation of Buprenorphine and Naloxone. N Engl J Med, 349 (10), 949958.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Project MATCH Research Group (1998). Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity: Project MATCH Three-Year Drinking Outcomes. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 22, 13001311.Google Scholar
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (July 17, 2014). The TEDS Report: Age of Substance Use Initiation among Treatment Admissions Aged 18 to 30. Rockville, MD.Google Scholar
Weiss, R. D., Potter, J. S., Fiellin, D. A., Byrne, M., Connery, H. S., et al. (2011). Adjunctive Counseling during Brief and Extended Buprenorphine-Naloxone Treatment for Prescription Opioid Dependence: A 2-Phase Randomized Controlled Trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry 68 (12), 12381246.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kleber, H. D., Weiss, R. D., Anton, R. F., George, T. P., Greenfield, S. F., et al. (2007). Work Group on Substance Use Disorders; American Psychiatric Association; Steering Committee on Practice Guidelines. Treatment of Patients with Substance Use Disorders, 2nd Edition. American Psychiatric Association. Am J Psychiatry, 164 (4 suppl.), 5123.Google Scholar
Alcoholics Anonymous, www.aa.orgGoogle Scholar
Narcotics Anonymous, www.na.orgGoogle Scholar
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), www.niaaa.nih.gov/Google Scholar
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), www.drugabuse.govGoogle Scholar
SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions (CIHS), http://wwwwww.integration.samhsa.govGoogle Scholar
Galanter, M., and Kleber, H. D. (eds.) (2015). The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment, 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.Google Scholar
Miller, W. R., and Rollnick, S. (2013). Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change (Applications of Motivational Interviewing), 3rd ed. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Anton, R. F., O’Malley, S. S., Ciraulo, D. A., Cisler, R. A., Couper, D., and the COMBINE Work Group (2006). Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence: The COMBINE Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA, 295 (17), 20032017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anton, R. F., Oroszi, G., O’Malley, S., Couper, D., Swift, R., Pettinati, H., and Goldman, D. (2008). An Evaluation of Mu-Opioid Receptor (OPRM1) as a Predictor of Naltrexone Response in the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence: Results from the Combined Pharmacotherapies and Behavioral Interventions for Alcohol Dependence (COMBINE) Study. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 65 (2), 135144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carliner, H., Keyes, K., and McLaughlin, K. (2016). Childhood Trauma and Illicit Drug Use in Adolescence: A Population-Based National Comorbidity Survey Replication-Adolescent Supplement Study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 55 (8), 701708.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fudala, P. J., Bridge, T. P., Herbert, S., Williford, W. O., Chiang, C. N., and the Buprenorphine/Naloxone Collaborative Group (2003). Office-Based Treatment of Opiate Addiction with a Sublingual-Tablet Formulation of Buprenorphine and Naloxone. N Engl J Med, 349 (10), 949958.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Project MATCH Research Group (1998). Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity: Project MATCH Three-Year Drinking Outcomes. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 22, 13001311.Google Scholar
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (July 17, 2014). The TEDS Report: Age of Substance Use Initiation among Treatment Admissions Aged 18 to 30. Rockville, MD.Google Scholar
Weiss, R. D., Potter, J. S., Fiellin, D. A., Byrne, M., Connery, H. S., et al. (2011). Adjunctive Counseling during Brief and Extended Buprenorphine-Naloxone Treatment for Prescription Opioid Dependence: A 2-Phase Randomized Controlled Trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry 68 (12), 12381246.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kleber, H. D., Weiss, R. D., Anton, R. F., George, T. P., Greenfield, S. F., et al. (2007). Work Group on Substance Use Disorders; American Psychiatric Association; Steering Committee on Practice Guidelines. Treatment of Patients with Substance Use Disorders, 2nd Edition. American Psychiatric Association. Am J Psychiatry, 164 (4 suppl.), 5123.Google Scholar
Alcoholics Anonymous, www.aa.orgGoogle Scholar
Narcotics Anonymous, www.na.orgGoogle Scholar
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), www.niaaa.nih.gov/Google Scholar
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), www.drugabuse.govGoogle Scholar
SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions (CIHS), http://wwwwww.integration.samhsa.govGoogle Scholar

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