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13 - Child Psychiatry and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2021

Audrey Walker
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Steven Schlozman
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Jonathan Alpert
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
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Summary

Given that children and adolescents can never be thought of simply as “little adults” but rather as patients with their own unique developmental, psychological, and biological characteristics, it is crucial that clinicians recognize how psychopathology presents differently in this population. Key differences between children, adolescents, and adults regarding epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, and treatment are described below for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, trauma and stressor-related disorders, and psychotic symptoms.

Type
Chapter
Information
Introduction to Psychiatry
Preclinical Foundations and Clinical Essentials
, pp. 318 - 328
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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