Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-c47g7 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-20T15:10:05.863Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

5 - Industrial organisation and sustainability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2013

Catherine Esnouf
Affiliation:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Paris
Marie Russel
Affiliation:
Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Paris
Nicolas Bricas
Affiliation:
Centre de Co-opération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), Paris
Get access

Summary

A large proportion of foods are produced today by industrial chains that are confronted by numerous challenges. Like all industries, they need to integrate new requirements relative to the environment and sustainability into their activities. Yet they are also subject to major trends, affecting both final consumption and agricultural production. Indeed, on the one hand, consumers (or at least some of them) are expressing new demands relative to food and how it is produced. On the other hand, current trends at the agricultural level may suggest possible changes in the availability, supply regularity and prices of agricultural raw materials. Finally, the competition in which companies are involved at national, European or international levels raises questions as to evolution in their medium and longer term competitiveness.

The aim of this chapter is to review some of the important features of past evolutions and of the technological and economic ‘model’ upon which they were based. It is thus ‘agri-industrial systems’, as defined in Chapter 4, which are addressed here. We will then try to identify, in terms of sustainability, the principal challenges faced by these industrial chains, and finally to clarify a certain number of important themes that need to be investigated in future research programmes in order to enlighten public and private decision-making in this field.

Type
Chapter
Information
Food System Sustainability
Insights From duALIne
, pp. 101 - 114
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×