Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-mhx7p Total loading time: 0.245 Render date: 2022-05-27T20:09:14.813Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

8 - Energy and nutrients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Peter Thomas
Affiliation:
Keele University
John Packham
Affiliation:
University of Wolverhampton
Get access

Summary

Growth and the limitations to it are of general interest to forest ecologists and of particular concern to foresters who grow trees as a crop. All tree species influence the nutrient content and other aspects of the soils in which they grow. Whether this results in an overall advantage or disadvantage to themselves, other plants, animals and the soil often depends upon local conditions and forestry practice. This chapter investigates how growth is measured, how it accumulates as biomass and the distinction between how much a tree can grow each year versus how much biomass the whole forest ecosystem can accumulate. The second part deals with nutrient flows and the problems of gains, losses and limitations. Much of what we know about temperate hardwood forests stems from the work carried out at Hubbard Brook (see Box 8.1).

Growth of forests

Biomass and productivity

The sheer size of forest and woodlands is what people often comment upon. The weight or mass of organic material present is referred to as the biomass (or sometimes the standing crop). It should be borne in mind that this can be a somewhat loose term since it may or may not include dead wood or litter. Table 8.1 shows that the biomass above ground increases from the boreal forest towards the tropics, starting from very low levels at the Arctic treeline and reaching in excess of 940 t ha-1 in the Amazon basin. However, there are exceptionally large forests outside the tropics, the record-holders being the temperate forests of the Pacific Northwest of North America including stands of huge Douglas fir (1600 t ha-1) and coastal redwoods, the tallest trees in the world (trunk biomass of 3450 t ha-1 with total net primary productivity (NPP) possibly approaching a staggering 4500 t ha-1 y-1).

Type
Chapter
Information
Ecology of Woodlands and Forests
Description, Dynamics and Diversity
, pp. 318 - 349
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Energy and nutrients
  • Peter Thomas, Keele University, John Packham, University of Wolverhampton
  • Book: Ecology of Woodlands and Forests
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511805578.010
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Energy and nutrients
  • Peter Thomas, Keele University, John Packham, University of Wolverhampton
  • Book: Ecology of Woodlands and Forests
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511805578.010
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Energy and nutrients
  • Peter Thomas, Keele University, John Packham, University of Wolverhampton
  • Book: Ecology of Woodlands and Forests
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511805578.010
Available formats
×