Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j5sqr Total loading time: 1.588 Render date: 2022-09-28T08:03:44.782Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Susan A. Speer
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
Elizabeth Stokoe
Affiliation:
Loughborough University
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Conversation and Gender , pp. 310 - 335
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ainsworth-Vaughn, N. (1992). Topic transitions in physician–patient interviews: Power, gender, and discourse change. Language in Society, 21, 409–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
,American Psychiatric Association (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC:American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
Antaki, C. (1999). Interviewing persons with a learning disability: How setting lower standards may inflate well-being scores. Qualitative Health Research, 9 (4), 437–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Antaki, C. (ed.) (in press). Applied Conversation Analysis: Changing Institutional Practices. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.
Antaki, C., & Widdicombe, S. (1998). Identity as an achievement and as a tool. In C. Antaki & S. Widdicombe (eds.), Identities in Talk. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Aries, E. (1996). Men and Women in Interaction: Considering the Differences. New York:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Atkinson, J. M., & Heritage, J. (eds.) (1984). Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Baker, C. D. (2000). Locating culture in action: Membership categorization in texts and talk. In A. Lee & C. Poynton (eds.), Culture and Text: Discourse and Methodology in Social Research and Cultural Studies. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Baker, P. (2008). Sexed Texts: Language, Gender and Sexuality. London:Equinox.Google Scholar
Baron, D. (1986). Grammar and Gender. New Haven, CT:Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Barsky, A. E. (1996). Mediation and empowerment in child protection cases. Mediation Quarterly, 14 (2), 111–34.Google Scholar
Bauman, Z. (2004). Identity. Cambridge:Polity.Google Scholar
Baxter, J. (2003). Positioning Gender in Discourse: A Feminist Methodology. Basingstoke:Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beach, W. A. (1996). Conversations about Illness: Family Preoccupations with Bulimia. Mahwah, NJ:Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Beach, W. A. (2000). Inviting collaborations in stories about a woman. Language in Society, 29, 379–407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beach, W. A. (2006). Who are ‘they’? Speakers' practices for referring to known and unknown others. Manuscript.
Beach, W. A. (2009). A Natural History of Family Cancer: Interactional Resources for Managing Illness. Cresskill, NJ:Hampton Press.Google Scholar
Beach, W. A., & Lockwood, A. (2003). Making the case for airline compassion fares: The serial organization of problem narratives during a family crisis. Research on Language and Social Interation, 36, 351–93.Google Scholar
Bem, S. L. (1993). Lenses of Gender. New Haven, CT:Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Benor, S., Rose, M., Sharma, D., Sweetland, J., & Zhang, Q. (eds.) (2002). Gendered Practices in Language. Stanford, CA:Centre for the Study of Language and Information.Google Scholar
Benwell, B. (2004). Ironic discourse: Evasive masculinity in brutish men's lifestyle magazines. Men and Masculinities, 7 (1), 3–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Benwell, B., & Stokoe, E. (2006). Discourse and Identity. Edinburgh:Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Benwell, B., & Stokoe, E. (2010). Identity in social action: Conversation, narratives and genealogies. In M. Wetherell & C. T. Mohanty (eds.), Sage Handbook of Identities. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Berard, T. J. (2005). On multiple identities and educational contexts: Remarks on the study of inequalities and discrimination. Journal of Language, Identity and Education, 4 (1), 67–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berentzen, S. (1984). Children Constructing their Social World: An Analysis of Gender Contrast in Children's Interaction in a Nursery School. Bergen Occasional Papers in Social Anthropology, No. 36: Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen.
Bergman, J. (1993). Discreet Indiscretions: The Social Organization of Gossip. Hawthome, NY:Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Bergman, J., & Linnell, P. (eds.) (1998). Morality in discourse. Special issue of Research on Language and Social Interaction, 31 (3/4).
Bergvall, V. L., Bing, J. M., & Freed, A. F. (eds.) (1996). Rethinking Language and Gender Research: Theory and Practice. Harlow:Addison Wesley Longman.Google Scholar
Billig, M. (1999). Whose terms? Whose ordinariness? Rhetoric and ideology in conversation analysis. Discourse and Society, 10, 543–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Björk-Willén, P. (2007). Participation in multilingual preschool play: Shadowing and crossing as interactional resources. Journal of Pragmatics, 39, 2133–2158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boden, D., & Zimmerman, D. H. (1991). Talk and Social Structure: Studies in Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis. Berkeley and Los Angeles:University of California Press.Google Scholar
Boenke, M. (2003). Darn those new names and pronouns. PLAG Transgender Network. www.youth-guard.org/pflag-tnet/articles/pronouns.htm. Accessed 25 April 2006.
Bohan, J. S. (1993). Regarding gender: Essentialism, constructionism and feminist psychology. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 17, 5–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bornstein, K. (1998). My Gender Workbook: How to Become a Real Man, a Real Woman, the Real You, or Something Else Entirely. New York:Routledge.Google Scholar
Boyd, E., & Heritage, J. (2006). Taking the history: Questioning during comprehensive history-taking. In J. Heritage & D. W. Maynard (eds.), Communication in Medical Care: Interaction Between Primary Care Physicians and Patients. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Brooks, A., & Marianne, D. (2004). Biological sex and psychological gender as predictors of routine and strategic relational maintenance. Sex Roles, 50 (9–10), 689–97.Google Scholar
Bucholtz, M. (1999). Series foreword. In M. Bucholtz, A. C. Liang, & L. A. Sutton (eds.), Reinventing Identities: The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bucholtz, M. (2003). Theories of discourse as theories of gender: Discourse analysis in language and gender studies. In J. Holmes & M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Bucholtz, M. (ed.) (2004). Language and Woman's Place: Text and Commentaries. New York:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bucholtz, M., & Hall, K. (2004). Theorizing identity in language and sexuality research. Language in Society, 33, 469–515.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bucholtz, M., & Hall, K. (2005). Identity and interaction: A sociolinguistic cultural approach. Discourse Studies, 7 (4–5), 585–614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bucholtz, M., Liang, A. C., & Sutton, L. A. (eds.) (1999). Reinventing Identities: The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Burman, D. D., Bitan, T., & Booth, J. R. (2008). Sex differences in neural processing of language among children. Neuropsychologia, 46 (5), 1349–62.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Butler, C. W. (2008). Talk and Social Interaction in the Playground. Ashgate:Aldershot.Google Scholar
Butler, C. W., & Weatherall, A. (2006). ‘No, we're not playing families’: Membership categorisation in children's play. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 39, 441- 70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Butler, J. (1990a). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York:Routledge.Google Scholar
Butler, J. (1990b). Performative acts and gender constitution: An essay in phenomenology and feminist theory. In S. Case (ed.), Performing Feminisms: Feminist Critical Theory and Theatre. Baltimore, MD:Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Buttny, R. (1997). Reported speech in talking race on campus. Human Communication Research, 23, 475–504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buttny, R. (1998). Putting prior talk into context: Reported speech and the reporting context. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 31, 45–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buzzanell, P. M., Sterk, H., & Turner, L. H. (eds.) (2004). Gender in Applied Communication Contexts. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Cahill, S. (1986). Language practices and self definition: The case of gender identity acquisition. Sociological Quarterly, 27, 295–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D. (1992). Feminism and Linguistic Theory. Basingstoke:Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D. (1996). Rethinking language and gender studies. In S. Mills (ed.), Language and Gender: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Harlow:Longman.Google Scholar
Cameron, D. (1997a). Demythologizing sociolinguistics. In N. Coupland & A. Jaworski (eds.), Sociolinguistics: A Coursebook and Reader. Basingstoke:Macmillan.Google Scholar
Cameron, D. (1997b). Theoretical debates in feminist linguistics: Questions of sex and gender. In R. Wodak (ed.), Gender and Discourse. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Cameron, D. (ed.) (1998a). The Feminist Critique of Language: A Reader. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Cameron, D. (1998b). Gender, language, and discourse: A review essay. Signs, 23 (4), 945–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D. (2005a). Language, gender, and sexuality: Current issues and new directions. Applied Linguistics, 26 (4), 482–502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D. (2005b). Relativity and its discontents: Language, gender and pragmatics. Intercultural Pragmatics, 2 (3), 321–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D. (2007). The Myth of Mars and Venus: Do Men and Women Really Speak Different Languages?Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cameron, D. (2009). Theoretical issues for the study of gender and spoken interaction. In P. Pichler & E.M. Eppler (eds.), Gender and Spoken Interaction. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Cameron, D., & Kulick, D. (2003a). Language and Sexuality. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D., & Kulick, D. (2003b). Introduction: Language and desire in theory and practice. Language and Communication, 23, 93–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, D., McAlinden, F., & O'Leary, K. (1988). Lakoff in context: The social and linguistic functions. In J. Coates & D. Cameron (eds.), Women in their Speech Communities: New Perspectives on Language and Sex. New York:Longman.Google Scholar
Chaitow, L. (1998). Fibromyalgia and Muscle Pain. London:Thorsons/HarperCollins.Google Scholar
Cheshire, J., & Trudgill, P. (eds.) (1998). The Sociolinguistics Reader: Gender and Discourse (Vol. 2). London:Arnold.Google Scholar
Chesler, P. (1972). Women and Madness. New York:Four Wall Eight Windows.Google Scholar
Christiansen, S. L., & Palkovitz, R. (2001). Why the ‘good provider’ role still matters: Providing as a form of paternal involvement. Journal of Family Issues, 22 (1), 84–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Christie, C. (2000). Gender and Language: Towards a Feminist Pragmatics. Edinburgh:Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
Clayman, S. E. (1992). Footing in the achievement of neutrality: The case of news interview discourse. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (eds.), Talk at Work: Interaction in Institutional Settings. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Clayman, S. E. (2007). Speaking on behalf of the public in broadcast news interviews. In E. Holt & R. Clift (eds.), Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Clayman, S., & Heritage, J. (2002). The News Interview: Journalists and Public Figures on the Air. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clayman, S., & Whalen, J. (1988/9). When the medium becomes the message: The case of the Rather–Bush encounter. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 22, 241–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clift, R. (2001). Meaning in interaction: The case of ‘actually’. Language, 77 (2), 245–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clift, R. (2006). Indexing stance: Reported speech as an interactional evidential. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 10 (5), 569–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coates, J. (1996). Women Talk. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Coates, J. (1997). Women's friendships, women's talk. In R. Wodak (ed.), Gender and Discourse. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Coates, J. (ed.) (1998a). Language and Gender: A Reader. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Coates, J. (1998b). Gossip revisited: Language in an all-female group. In J. Coates (ed.), Language and Gender: A Reader. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Coates, J. (1999). Changing femininities: The talk of teenage girls. In M. Bucholtz, A. C. Liang, & L. A. Sutton (eds.), Reinventing Identities: The Gendered Self in Discourse. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Coates, J. (2003). Men Talk. Oxford:Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coates, J. (2004). Women, Men and Language: A Sociolinguistic Account of Gender Differences in Language (3rd ed.). Harlow:Longman.Google Scholar
Coates, J., & Cameron, D. (eds.) (1988). Women in their Speech Communities. Harlow:Longman.Google Scholar
Cobb, C., Danby, S., & Farrell, A. (2009). Young children as rule makers. Journal of Pragmatics, 41 (8), 1477–92.Google Scholar
Cobb, S. (1993). Empowerment and mediation: A narrative perspective. Negotiation Journal, 9 (3), 245–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conefrey, T. (1997). Gender, culture and authority in a university life sciences laboratory. Discourse and Society, 8 (3), 313–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conrick, M. (1999). Womenspeak. Dublin:Marino Books.Google Scholar
Cook-Gumperz, J., & Szymanski, M. (2001). Classroom ‘Families’: Cooperating or competing – girls' and boys' interactional styles in a bilingual classroom. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 34 (1), 107–30.Google Scholar
Corbett, G. G. (2005). Sex-based and non-sex-based gender systems. In M. Haspelmath, M. S. Dryer, D. Gil, & B. Comrie (eds.), The World Atlas of Language Structures. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Corsaro, W. A. (2005). The Sociology of Childhood. Thousand Oaks, CA:Pine Forge Press.Google Scholar
Craib, I. (2000). Narratives as bad faith. In M. Andrews, S. Day Sclater, C. Squire, & A. Treacher (eds.), Lines of Narrative: Psychosocial Perspectives. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Crawford, M. (1995). Talking Difference: On Gender and Language. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Cromdal, J. (2001). ‘Can I be with?’ Negotiating play entry in a bilingual school. Journal of Pragmatics, 33, 517–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cromdal, J. (2004). Building bilingual oppositions: Code-switching in children's disputes. Language in Society, 33, 33–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cromdal, J. (2009). Childhood and social interaction in everyday life: Introduction to the special issue. Journal of Pragmatics, 41 (8), 1473–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Curl, T. S. (2006). Offers of assistance: Constraints on syntactic design. Journal of Pragmatics, 38, 1257–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Curl, T. S., & Drew, P. (2008). Contingency and action: A comparison of two forms of requesting. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 41, 129–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Danby, S. (1998). The serious and playful work of gender: Talk and social order in a preschool classroom. In N. Yelland (ed.), Gender in Early Childhood. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Danby, S., & Baker, C. (1998). How to be masculine in the block area. Childhood, 5, 151–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, K. (1986). The process of problem (re)formulation in psychotherapy. Sociology of Health and Illness, 8 (1), 44–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, K. (1988). Paternalism under the microscope. In A. Dundas Todd & S. Fisher (eds.), Gender and Discourse: The Power of Talk. Norwood, NJ:Ablex.Google Scholar
DeFrancisco, V. L. (1991). The sounds of silence: How men silence women in marital relations. Discourse and Society, 2 (4), 413–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Devor, A. H. (1989). Gender Blending: Confronting the Limits of Duality. Bloomington:Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Dingwall, R. (1988). Empowerment or enforcement: Some questions about power and control in divorce mediation. In R. Dingwall & J. Eekelaar (eds.), Divorce Mediation and the Legal Process. New York:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Drescher, N. L. (2006). Sex, roles, and register: A corpus-based investigation of sex-linked features in university settings. Dissertation Abstracts International, A: The Humanities and Social Sciences.
Drew, P. (1978). Accusations: The occasioned use of members' knowledge of ‘religious geography’ in describing events. Sociology, 12, 1–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drew, P. (1984). Speakers' reportings in invitation sequences. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Drew, P. (1987). Po-faced receipts of teases. Linguistics, 25, 219–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drew, P. (2005). Conversation analysis. In K. L. Fitch & R. E. Sanders (eds.), Handbook of Language and Social Interaction. Mahwah, NJ:Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Drew, P., & Heritage, J. (1992a). Analyzing talk at work: An introduction. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (eds.), Talk at Work: Interaction in Institutional Settings. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Drew, P., & Heritage, J. (1992b). Talk at Work: Interaction in Institutional Settings. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Drew, P., Chatwin, J., & Collins, S. (2001). Conversation analysis: A method for research into interactions between patients and health-care professionals. Health Expectations, 4, 58–70.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eckert, P. (2003). Language and gender in adolescence. In J. Holmes & M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eckert, P., & McConnell-Ginet, S. (1998). Communities of practice: Where language, gender and power all live. In J. Coates (ed.), Language and Gender: A Reader. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Eckert, P. (eds.) (2003). Language and Gender. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edelsky, C. (1981). Who's got the floor? Language in Society, 10, 383–421.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ediger, R. (1991). Coping with Fibromyalgia. Toronto:LRH Publications.Google Scholar
Edley, N. (2001). Conversation analysis, discursive psychology and the study of ideology: A response to Susan Speer. Feminism and Psychology, 11 (1), 136–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edley, N., & Wetherell, M. (2001). Jekyll and Hyde: Men's constructions of feminism and feminists. Feminism and Psychology, 11 (4), 439–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D. (1991). Categories are for talking: On the cognitive and discursive bases of categorization. Theory and Psychology, 1 (4), 515–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D. (1994). Script formulations: An analysis of event descriptions in conversation. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 13, 211–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D. (1997). Discourse and Cognition. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Edwards, D. (1998). The relevant thing about her: Social identity categories in use. In C. Antaki & S. Widdicombe (eds.), Identities in Talk. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Edwards, D. (2000). Extreme case formulations: Softeners, investments and doing nonliteral. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 33, 347–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D. (2005). Moaning, whinging and laughing: The subjective side of complaints. Discourse Studies, 7 (1), 5–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D. (2006). Facts, norms and dispositions: Practical uses of the modal would in police interrogations. Discourse Studies, 8 (4), 475–501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D. (2007). Managing subjectivity in talk. In A. Hepburn & S. Wiggins (eds.), Discursive Research in Practice: New Approaches to Psychology and Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Edwards, D., & Potter, J. (1992). Discursive Psychology. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Edwards, D., & Stokoe, E. H. (2004). Discursive psychology, focus group interviews, and participants' categories. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22, 499–507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edwards, D., & Stokoe, E. H. (2007). Self-help in calls for help with problem neighbours. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 40 (1), 9–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Egbert, M. (2004). Other-initiated repair and membership categorization: Some conversational events that trigger linguistic and regional membership categorization. Journal of Pragmatics, 36 (8), 1467–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eglin, P. (2002). Members' gendering work: ‘Women’, ‘feminists’ and membership categorization analysis. Discourse and Society, 13 (6), 819–926.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eglin, P., & Hester, S. (1999). ‘You're all a bunch of feminists’: Categorization and the politics of terror in the Montreal Massacre. Human Studies, 22, 253–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eicher-Catt, D. (2004). Noncustodial mothering: A cultural paradox of competent performance – performative competence. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 33 (1), 72–108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Enfield, N. J. (2007). Meanings of the unmarked: How ‘default’ person reference does more than just refer. In N. J. Enfield & T. Stivers (eds.), Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Enfield, N. J., & Stivers, T. (eds.) (2007). Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evaldsson, A.-C. (2002). Boys' gossip telling: Staging identities and indexing (unacceptable) masculine behaviour. Text, 22 (2), 199–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evaldsson, A.-C. (2003). Throwing like a girl: Situating gender differences in physicality across game contexts. Childhood, 10 (4), 475–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evaldsson, A.-C. (2004). Shifting moral stances: Morality and gender in same-sex and cross-sex game interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 37 (3), 331–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evaldsson, A.-C. (2005). Staging insults and mobilizing categorizations in a multiethnic peer group. Discourse and Society, 16 (6),763–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evaldsson, A.-C. (2007). Accounting for friendship: Moral ordering and category membership in preadolescent girls' relational talk. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 40 (4), 377–404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Farris, C. E. P. (2000). Cross-sex peer conflict and the discursive production of gender in a Chinese preschool in Taiwan. Journal of Pragmatics, 32, 539–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fausto-Sterling, A. (2000). Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality. New York:Basic Books.Google Scholar
,Fawcett Society (2005). Money, money, money: Is it still a rich man's world? http://fawcettsociety.org.uk. Accessed 22 May 2007.
Feinberg, L. (1998). Trans Liberation: Beyond Pink or Blue. Boston:Beacon Press.Google Scholar
Fenstermaker, S., & West, C. (eds.) (2002). Doing Gender, Doing Difference: Inequality, Power, and Institutional Change. New York:Routledge.Google Scholar
Fishman, P. (1978). Interaction: The work women do. Social Problems, 25, 397–406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fishman, P. (1983). Interaction: The work women do. In B. Thorne, C. Kramarae, & N. Henley (eds.), Language, Gender and Society. Rowley, MA:Newbury House.Google Scholar
Ford, C. E., Fox, B., & Thompson, S. A. (1996). Practices in the construction of turns: The TCU revisited. Pragmatics, 6 (3), 427–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ford, C. E., Fox, B., & Thompson, S. A. (2002). Constituency and the grammar of turn increments. In C. E. Ford, B. Fox, & S. A. Thompson (eds.), The Language of Turn and Sequence. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Foucault, M. (1972). The Archaeology of Knowledge. London:Tavistock.Google Scholar
Francis, D. (1994). The golden dreams of the social constructionist. Journal of Anthropological Research, 50 (2), 1–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fransen, J., & Russell, I. J. (1996). The Fibromyalgia Help Book: Practical Guide to Living Better with Fibromyalgia. St Paul, MN:Smith House Press.Google Scholar
Freed, A. F. (1996). Language and gender research in an experimental setting. In V. L. Bergvall, J. M. Bing, & A. F. Freed (eds.), Rethinking Language and Gender Research: Theory and Practice. Harlow:Addison Wesley Longman.Google Scholar
Freed, A. F., & Greenwood, A. (1996). Women, men, and type of talk: What makes the difference? Language in Society, 23, 1–26.Google Scholar
Frith, H. (1998). Constructing the ‘other’ through talk. Feminism and Psychology, 8 (4), 530–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, A. C. (1991). Dispute resolution without disputing: How the interactional organization of mediation hearings minimizes argument. American Sociological Review, 56, 818–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, A. C. (1995). The problematics of representation in community mediation hearings: Implications for mediation practice. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 12 (4), 23–46.Google Scholar
Garcia, A. C. (1996). Moral reasoning in interactional context: Strategic uses of care and justice arguments in mediation hearings. Sociological Inquiry, 66 (2), 197–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, A. C. (1998). The relevance of interactional and institutional contexts for the study of gender differences: A demonstrative case study. Symbolic Interaction, 21 (1), 35–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, A. C. (2000). Negotiating negotiation: The collaborative production of resolution in small claims mediation hearings. Discourse and Society, 11 (3), 315–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, A. C., & Parmer, P. (1999). Misplaced mistrust: The collaborative construction of doubt in 911 emergency calls. Symbolic Interaction, 22 (4), 297–324.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garcia, A. C., Vise, K., & Whitaker, S. (2002). Disputing neutrality: When mediation empowerment is perceived as bias. Conflict Resolution Quarterly, 20 (2), 205–30.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, H. (1967). Studies in Ethnomethodology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ:Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Garnica, O. K. (1979). The boys have the muscles and the girls have the sexy legs: Adult–child speech and the use of generic person labels. In O. K. Garnica & M. L. King (eds.), Language, Children and Society. Oxford:Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
Gaunt, K. D. (2006). The Games Black Girls Play. New York:Teachers' College Press.Google Scholar
Gibbon, M. (1999). Feminist Perspectives on Language. Harlow:Pearson Education.Google Scholar
Gilligan, C. (1982). In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women's Development. Cambridge, MA:Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Glenn, P. (2003a). Laughter in Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glenn, P. (2003b). On sexism in conversational joking. Media and Culture, 6. www.media-culture.org.au/0311/1-glenn-feature-sexism.html>.
Goddard, A., & Patterson, L. M. (2000). Language and Gender. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Goffman, E. (1959). The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. Harmondsworth:Penguin.Google Scholar
Goffman, E. (1961). Encounters: Two Studies in the Sociology of Interaction. Indianapolis:Bobbs-Merrill.Google Scholar
Goffman, E. (1964). The neglected situation. American Anthropologist, 66, (6, pt II), 133–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goffman, E. (1979). Footing. Semiotica, 25,1–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goffman, E. (1981). Footing. In E. Goffman, Forms of Talk. Philadelphia:University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Golato, A. (2005). Compliments and Compliment Responses: Grammatical Structure and Sequential Organization. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodenough, W. H. (1965). Rethinking ‘status’ and ‘role’: Toward a general model of the cultural organization of social relationships. In M. Banton (ed.), The Relevance of Models for Social Anthropology. London:Tavistock.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1979). The interactive construction of a sentence in natural conversation. In G. Psathas (ed.), Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology. New York:Irvington.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1981). Conversational Organization: Interaction Between Speakers and Hearers. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1984). Notes on story structure and the organization of participation. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1986a). Audience diversity, participation and interpretation. Text, 6 (3), 283–316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1986b). Gesture as a resource for the organization of mutual orientation. Semiotica, 62 (1/2), 29–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1987a). Forgetfulness as an interactive resource. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50 (2), 115–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, C. (1987b). Unilateral departure. In G. Button & J. R. E. Lee (eds.), Talk and Social Organisation. Clevedon:Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Goodwin, C. (2002). Time in action. Current Anthropology, 43 (Supplement), 19–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, C., & Goodwin, M. H. (1987). Concurrent operations on talk: Notes on the interactive organization of assessments. IPrA Papers in Pragmatics, 1 (1), 1–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, C., & Goodwin, M. H. (2004). Participation. In A. Duranti (ed.), A Companion to Linguistic Anthropology. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (1990). He-Said She-Said: Talk as Social Organization Among Black Children. Bloomington:Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (1998). Games of stance: Conflict and footing in hopscotch. In S. Hoyle & C. T. Adger (eds.), Kids' Talk: Strategic Language Use in Later Childhood. New York:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (2001). Organizing participation in cross-sex jump rope: Situating gender differences within longitudinal studies of activities. Research on Language and Social Interaction (special issue), 34 (1), 75–106.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (2002a). Building power asymmetries in girls' interaction. Discourse and Society, 13 (6), 715–30.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (2002b). Exclusion in girls' peer groups: Ethnographic analysis of language practices on the playground. Human Development, 45 (6), 392–415.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (2003). Gender, ethnicity and class in children's peer interactions. In J. Holmes and M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Goodwin, M. H. (2006). The Hidden Life of Girls: Games of Stance, Status and Exclusion. Oxford:Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goodwin, M. H., Goodwin, C., & Yaeger-Dror, M. (2002). Multi-modality in girls' game disputes. Journal of Pragmatics, 34, 1621–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Graddol, D., & Swann, J. (1989). Gender Voices. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Gray, J. (1992). Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus: A Practical Guide for Improving Communication and Getting What you Want in your Relationships. London:Thorsons.Google Scholar
Greatbatch, D. (1988). A turn-taking system for British news interviews. Language in Society, 17, 401–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greatbatch, D., & Dingwall, R. (1997). Argumentative talk in divorce mediation sessions. American Sociological Review, 2 (1), 151–70.Google Scholar
Haakana, M. (2001). Laughter as a patient's resource: Dealing with delicate aspects of medical interaction. Text, 21, 187–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haddington, P. (2004). Stance taking in news interviews. SKY Journal of Linguistics, 17, 101–42.Google Scholar
Halkowski, T. (2006). Realizing the illness: Patients' narratives of symptom discovery. In J. Heritage & D. Maynard (eds.), Communication in Medical Care: Interaction between Primary Care Physicians and Patients. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hall, K., & Bucholtz, M. (eds.) (1995). Gender Articulated: Language and the Socially Constructed Self. New York:Routledge.Google Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K., & Hasan, R. (1976). Cohesion in English. London:Longman.Google Scholar
Hammersley, M. (2001). Obvious, all too obvious? Methodological issues in using sex/gender as a variable in educational research. In B. Francis & C. Skelton (eds.), Investigating Gender: Contemporary Perspectives in Education. Buckingham:Open University Press.Google Scholar
Harkness, S., & Super, C. M. (1985). The cultural context of gender segregation in children's peer groups. Child Development, 56, 219–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harrington, C. B. (1985). Shadow Justice: The Ideology and Institutionalization of Alternatives to Court. Westport, CT:Greenwood Press.Google Scholar
Harrington, G. S., & Farias, S. T. (2008). Sex differences in language processing: Functional MRI methodological considerations. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 27 (6), 1221–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harrington, K., Litosseliti, L., Saunston, H., & Sunderland, J. (eds.) (2008). Gender and Language Research Methodologies. Basingstoke:Palgrave.Google Scholar
Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association (2001). Standards of care for gender identity disorders (6th version). www.hbigda.org. Accessed July 2008.
Have, Ten P. (1999). Doing Conversation Analysis: A Practical Guide. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Have, Ten P. (2007). Doing Conversation Analysis: A Practical Guide (2nd ed.). London:Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hawkesworth, M. (1997). Confounding gender. Signs, 22 (3), 649–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heap, J. L. (1990). Applied ethnomethodology: Looking for the local rationality of reading activities. Human Studies, 13, 39–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henley, N. M. (1995). Ethnicity and gender issues in language. In H. Landrine (ed.), Bringing Cultural Diversity to Feminist Psychology: Theory, Research, and Practice. Washington, DC:American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Henley, N. M., & Kramarae, C. (1991). Gender, power and miscommunication. In H. Giles, N. Coupland, & J. M. Wiemann (eds.), ‘Miscommunication’ and Problematic Talk. Newbury Park, CA:Sage.Google Scholar
Hepburn, A. (2004). Crying: Notes on description, transcription and interaction. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 37, 251–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hepburn, A. (2005). ‘You're not takin me seriously’: Ethics and asymmetry in calls to a child protection helpline. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 18, 255–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hepburn, A. (2007). Turn medial tag questions. Paper presented at National Communication Association, Chicago.
Hepburn, A., & Potter, J. (2007). Crying receipts: Time, empathy and institutional practice. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 40, 89–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hepburn, A., & Potter, J. (2010). Interrogating tears: Some uses of ‘tag questions’ in a child protection helpline. In A. F. Freed & S. Ehrlich (eds.), ‘Why Do You Ask?’: The Function of Questions in Institutional Discourse. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hepburn, A., & Wiggins, S. (eds.) (2005). Developments in discursive psychology. Discourse and Society (special issue), 16 (5), 595–601.
Hepburn, A., & Wiggins, S. (eds.) (2007). Discursive Research in Practice: New Approaches to Psychology and Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, J. (1984a). A change-of-state token and aspects of its sequential placement. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Heritage, J. (1984b). Garfinkel and Ethnomethodology. Cambridge:Polity.Google Scholar
Heritage, J. (1998). Oh-prefaced responses to inquiry. Language in Society, 27, 291–334.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, J. (2002a). The limits of questioning: Negative interrogatives and hostile question content. Journal of Pragmatics, 34, 1427–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, J. (2002b). Oh-prefaced responses to assessments: A method of modifying agreement/disagreement. In C. E. Ford, B. A. Fox, & S. A. Thompson (eds.), The Language of Turn and Sequence. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Heritage, J. (2005). Conversation analysis and institutional talk. In K. L. Fitch & R. E. Sanders (eds.), Handbook of Language and Social Interaction. Mahwah, NJ:Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Heritage, J. (2007). Intersubjectivity and progressivity in references to persons (and places). In N. Enfield & T. Stivers (eds.), Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Heritage, J., & Atkinson, J. M. (1984). Introduction. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Heritage, J., & Maynard, D. (eds.) (2006). Communication in Medical Care: Interaction between Primary Care Physicians and Patients. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, J., & Raymond, G. (2005). The terms of agreement: Indexing epistemic authority and subordination in talk-in-interaction. Social Psychology Quarterly, 68 (1), 15–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heritage, J., Robinson, J. D., Elliott, M., Beckett, M., & Wilkes, M. (2007). Reducing patients' unmet concerns in primary care: The difference one word can make. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 22 (10), 1429–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hester, S. (2000). The local order of deviance in school: Membership categorisation, motives and morality in referral talk. In S. Hester & D. Francis (eds.), Local Educational Order. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hester, S., & Eglin, P. (1997). Membership categorization analysis: An introduction. In S. Hester & P. Eglin (eds.), Culture in Action: Studies in Membership Categorization Analysis. Boston:International Institute for Ethnomethodology and University Press of America.Google Scholar
Hollway, W., & Jefferson, T. (2000). Doing Qualitative Research Differently: Free Association, Narrative and the Interview Method. London:Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, J. (1995). Women, Men and Politeness. Harlow:Longman.Google Scholar
Holmes, J. (2007). Social constructionism, postmodernism and feminist sociolinguistics. Gender and Language, 1 (1), 51–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, J., & Meyerhoff, M. (1999). The community of practice: Theories and methodologies in language and gender research. Language in Society, 28, 173–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, J., & Meyerhoff, M. (eds.) (2003). The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holt, E. (1996). Reporting on talk: The use of direct reported speech in conversation. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 29, 219–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holt, E. (1999). Just gassing: An analysis of direct reported speech in a conversation between two employees of a gas supply company. Text, 19, 505–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holt, E. (2000). Reporting and reacting: Concurrent responses to reported speech. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 33 (4), 425–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holt, E., & Clift, R. (eds.) (2007a). Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Holt, E., & Clift, R. (2007b). ‘I'm eyeing your chop up mind’: Reporting and enacting. In E. Holt & R. Clift (eds.), Reporting Talk: Reported Speech in Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hopper, R. (2003). Gendering Talk. East Lansing, MI:Michigan State University Press.Google Scholar
Hopper, R., & LeBaron, C. (1998). How gender creeps into talk. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 31 (3), 59–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hutchby, I., & Wooffitt, R. (2008). Conversation analysis (2nd ed.). Cambridge:Polity.Google Scholar
James, A., & Prout, A. (1990). Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood: Contemporary Issues in the Sociological Study of Childhood. London:Falmer Press.Google Scholar
James, A., Jenks, C., & Prout, A. (1998). Theorizing Childhood. Cambridge:Polity.Google Scholar
James, D., & Clarke, S. (1993). Women, men, and interruptions: A critical review. In D. Tannen (ed.), Gender and Conversational Interaction. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
James, D., & Drakich, J. (1993). Understanding gender differences in amount of talk: A critical review of research. In D. Tannen (ed.), Gender and Conversational Interaction. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Järviluoma, H., Moisala, P., & Vilkko, A. (2003). Gender and Qualitative Methods. London:Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jayyusi, L. (1984). Categorization and the Moral Order. Boston:Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Jayyusi, L. (1991). Values and moral judgment: Communicative praxis as moral order. In G. Button (ed.), Ethnomethodology and the Human Sciences. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G. (1974). Error correction as an interactional resource. Language in Society, 3 (2), 181–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jefferson, G. (1978). Sequential aspects of storytelling in conversation. In J. Schenkien (ed.), Studies in the Organization of Conversational Interaction. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G. (1979). A technique for inviting laughter and its subsequent acceptance/declination. In G. Psathas (ed.), Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology. New York:Irvington.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G. (1983). Issues in the transcription of naturally-occurring talk: Caricature versus capturing pronunciational particulars. Tilburg Papers in Language and Literature, 34, 1–12.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G. (1987). On exposed and embedded correction in conversation. In G. Button & J. R. E. Lee (eds.), Talk and Social Organization. Clevedon:Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G. (1996). On the poetics of ordinary talk. Text and Performance Quarterly, 16 (1), 1–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jefferson, G. (2004a). Glossary of transcript symbols with an introduction. In G. H. Lerner (ed.), Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G. (2004b). A note on laughter in ‘male–female’ interaction. Discourse Studies, 6, 117–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jefferson, G. (2004c). ‘At first I thought’: A normalizing device for extraordinary events. In G. H. Lerner (ed.), Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Jefferson, G., Sacks, H., & Schegloff, E. (1987). Notes on laughter in the pursuit of intimacy. In G. Button & J. R. E. Lee (eds.), Talk and Social Organisation. Clevedon:Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Johnson, S., & Meinhof, U. (eds.) (1997). Language and Masculinity. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Jurik, N. C., & Siemsen, C. (2009). ‘Doing gender’ as canon or agenda: A symposium on West and Zimmerman. Gender and Society, 23 (1), 72–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karkkainen, E. (2006). Stance taking in conversation: From subjectivity to intersubjectivity. Text and Talk, 26 (6), 699–731.Google Scholar
Kendall, S. (2008). The balancing act: Framing gendered parental identities at dinnertime. Language in Society, 37, 539–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kessler, S. J., & McKenna, W. (1978). Gender: An Ethnomethodological Approach. New York:John Wiley.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2000a). Doing feminist conversation analysis. Feminism and Psychology, 10, 163–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2000b). How to resist an idiom. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 33, 121–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2002). Doing feminist conversation analysis. In P. McIlvenny (ed.), Talking Gender and Sexuality. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2005a). Speaking as a heterosexual: (How) does sexuality matter for talk-in-interaction? Research on Language and Social Interaction, 38 (3), 221–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2005b). Heteronormativity in action: Reproducing the heterosexual nuclear family in after-hours medical calls. Social Problems, 52 (4), 477–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2006). Talking sex and gender. In P. Drew, G. Raymond, & D. Weinberg (eds.), Talk and Interaction in Social Research Methods. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2007a). Feminist research practice: The promise of conversation analysis for feminist research. Feminism and Psychology, 17, 133–48.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2007b). Is ‘woman’ always relevantly gendered? Gender and Language, 1 (1), 39–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (ed.) (2007c). Special feature: Feminist conversation analysis: Research by students at the University of York, UK. Feminism and Psychology, 17 (2), 133–236.
Kitzinger, C. (2008a). Developing feminist conversation analysis: A response to Wowk. Human Studies, 31 (2), 179–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C. (2008b). Conversation analysis: Technical matters for gender research. In K. Harrington, L. Litosseliti, H. Saunston, & J. Sunderland (eds.), Gender and Language Research Methodologies. Basingstoke:Palgrave.Google Scholar
Kitzinger, C., & Kitzinger, S. (2007). Birth trauma: Talking with women and the value of conversation analysis. British Journal of Midwifery, 15 (5), 256–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C., & Mandelbaum, J. (2007). Word selection and social identities in talk-in-interaction. Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Sociological Association. Chicago. August.
Kitzinger, C., & Peel, E. (2005). The de-gaying and regaying of AIDS: Contested homophobias in lesbian and gay awareness training. Discourse and Society, 16 (2), 173–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C., & Rickford, R. (2007). Becoming a ‘bloke’: The construction of gender in interaction. Feminism and Psychology, 17 (2), 214–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitzinger, C., & Wilkinson, S. (in press). Identifying and remediating heterosexist talk. In C. Antaki (ed.), Applied Conversation Analysis: Changing Institutional Practices. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.
Koch, M. (2008). Language and Gender Research from a Queer Linguistic Perspective. Saarbrücken:VDM.Google Scholar
Kochman, T. (1981). Black and White: Styles in Conflict. Chicago:University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Koller, V. (2004). Businesswomen and war metaphors: ‘Possessive, jealous and pugnacious’? Journal of Sociolinguistics, 8 (1), 3–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Korobov, N., & Bamberg, M. (2004). Positioning a ‘mature’ self in interactive practices: How adolescent males negotiate ‘physical attraction’ in group talk. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 22, 471–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kulick, D. (1999). Language and gender/sexuality. Language and Culture Mailing List: Online Symposium. www.language-culture.org/archives/subs/kulick-don/index.html.
Kyratzis, A. (1999). Narrative identity: Preschoolers' self-construction through narrative in same-sex friendship group dramatic play. Narrative Inquiry, 9 (2), 427–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kyratzis, A. (2001a). Children's gender indexing in language: From the separate worlds hypothesis to considerations of culture, context, and power. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 34 (1), 1–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kyratzis, A. (2001b). Constituting the emotions: A longitudinal study of emotion talk in a preschool friendship group of boys. In B. Baron & H. Kotthoff (eds.), Gender in Interaction: Perspectives on Femininity and Masculinity in Ethnography and Discourse. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Kyratzis, A., & Guo, J. (1996). ‘Separate worlds for girls and boys?’ Views from U.S. and Chinese mixed-sex friendship groups. In D. Slobin, J. Gerhardt, A. Kyratzis, & J. Guo (eds.), Social Interaction, Social Context, and Language: Essays in Honor of Susan Ervin-Tripp. Mahwaw, NJ:Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Labov, W. (1972a). Sociolinguistic Patterns. Philadelphia:University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Labov, W. (1972b). Rules for ritual insults. In W. Labov, Language in the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular. Philadelphia:University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Labov, W., & Fanshell, D. (1977). Therapeutic Discourse: Psychotherapy as Conversation. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Lakoff, R. (1973). Language and woman's place. Language in Society, 2, 45–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, R. (1975). Language and Woman's Place. New York:Harper & Row.Google Scholar
Lakoff, R. (2003). Language, gender, and politics: Putting ‘women’ and ‘power’ in the same sentence. In J. Holmes & M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Lanclos, D. M. (2003). At Play in Belfast: Children's Folklore and Identities in Northern Ireland. New Brunswick, NJ:Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
Land, V., & Kitzinger, C. (2005). Speaking as a lesbian: Correcting the heterosexist presumption. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 38, 371–416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Land, V., & Kitzinger, C. (2007). Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference. Discourse and Society, 9, 493–525.Google Scholar
Lazar, M. M. (ed.) (2005). Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis: Gender, Power and Ideology in Discourse. London:Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lazar, M. M. (2007). Feminist critical discourse analysis: Articulating a feminist discourse praxis. Critical Discourse Studies, 4 (2), 141–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leap, W. (1996). Word's Out: Gay Men's English. Minneapolis:University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
Lerner, G. H. (1996). Finding ‘face’ in the preference structures of talk-in-interaction. Social Psychology Quarterly, 59 (4), 303–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, G. H. (2002). Turn-sharing: The choral co-production of talk-in-interaction. In C. Ford, B. Fox, & S. Thompson (eds.), The Language of Turn and Sequence. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Lerner, G. H. (2003). Selecting next speaker: The context-sensitive operation of a context-free organization. Language in Society, 32, 177–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, G. H. (2004). Collaborative turn sequences. In G. H. Lerner (ed.), Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, G. H., & Kitzinger, C. (2007a). Introduction: Person-reference in conversation analytic research. Discourse Studies, 9 (4), 427–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, G. H., & Kitzinger, C. (2007b). Extraction and aggregation in the repair of individual and collective self-reference. Discourse Studies, 9, 526–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lev, A. I. (2004). Transgender Emergence: Therapeutic Guidelines for Working with Gender-Variant People and their Famillies. Binghampton, NY:Haworth Clinical Practice Press.Google Scholar
Levinson, S. (1988). Putting linguistics on a proper footing: Explorations in Goffman's concepts of participation. In P. Drew & A. Wootton (eds.), Erving Goffman: Studies in the Interactional Order. Cambridge:Polity.Google Scholar
Liang, A. C. (1999). Conversationally implicating lesbian and gay identity. In M. Bucholtz, A. C. Liang, & L. A. Sutton (eds.), Reinventing Identities: The Gendered Self in Discourse. New York:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Litosseliti, L. (2006). Gender and Language: An Introduction and Resource Book. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Livia, A., & Hall, K. (eds.) (1997). Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender and Sexuality. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Lorber, J. (1994). Paradoxes of Gender. New Haven, CT:Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Lorber, J. (2000). Using gender to undo gender: A feminist degendering movement. Feminist Theory, 1 (1), 79–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lynch, M. (1993). Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Lynch, M. (2001). Ethnomethodology and the logic of practice. In K. Knorr-Cetina, E.v. Savigny, & T. R. Schatzki (eds.), The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Lynch, M., & Bogen, D. (1996). The Spectacle of History: Speech, Text and Memory at the Iran–Contra Hearings. Durham, NC:Duke University Press.Google Scholar
Macbeth, D. (2004). The relevance of repair for classroom correction. Language in Society, 33, 703–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maccoby, E. E., & Jacklin, C. N. (1974). The Psychology of Sex Differences. Stanford, CA:Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Macpherson, D. A., & Hirsch, B. T. (1995). Wages and gender composition: Why do women's jobs pay less? Journal of Labor Economics, 13 (3), 426–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maltz, D. N., & Borker, R. A. (1982). A cultural approach to male–female miscommunication. In J. J. Gumperz (ed.), Language and Social Identity. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Maltz, D. N., & Borker, R. A. (1998). A cultural approach to male–female miscommunication. In J. Coates (ed.), Language and Gender: A Reader. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
May, K. (2002). Becoming women: Transgendered identities, psychosexual therapy and the challenge of metamorphosis. Sexualities, 5 (4), 449–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mayall, B. (1996). Children, Health and the Social Order. Buckingham:Open University Press.Google Scholar
Maynard, D. W. (1992). On clinicians co-implicating recipients' perspective in the delivery of diagnostic news. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (eds.), Talk at Work: Interaction in Institutional Settings. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Maynard, D. W. (2003). Good News, Bad News: Conversational Order in Everyday Talk and Clinical Settings. Chicago:University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Maynard, D. W., Houtkoop, H., Schaeffer, N. C., & van der Zouwen, H. (eds.) (2002). Standardization and Tacit Knowledge: Interaction and Practice in the Survey Interview. New York:Wiley Interscience.Google Scholar
McConnell-Ginet, S. (2003). ‘What's in a name?’: Social labeling and gender practices. In J. Holmes & M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
McElhinny, B. (2003). Theorizing gender in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. In J. Holmes & M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
McHoul, A. W. (1987). An initial investigation in the usability of fictional conversation for doing conversation analysis. Semiotica, 67 (1–2), 83–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McIlvenny, P. (2002a). Introduction: Researching talk, gender and sexuality. In P. McIlvenny (ed.), Talking Gender and Sexuality: Conversation, Performativity and Discourse in Interaction. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McIlvenny, P. (ed.) (2002b). Talking Gender and Sexuality: Conversation, Performativity and Discourse in Interaction. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McMullen, L. M., Vernon, A. E., & Murton, T. (1995). Division of labor in conversations: Are Fishman's results replicable and generalizable? Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 24 (4), 255–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Menz, F., & Al-Roubaie, A. (2008). Interruptions, status and gender in medical interviews: The harder you brake, the longer it takes. Discourse and Society, 19 (5), 645–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mills, S. (ed.) (1996). Language and Gender: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Harlow:Longman.Google Scholar
Mills, S. (2003). Gender and Politeness. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mills, S. (2008). Language and Sexism. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moerman, M., & Sacks, H. (1988 [1970]). On ‘understanding’ in the analysis of natural conversation. In M. Moerman (ed.), Talking Culture: Ethnography and Conversation Analysis. Philadelphia:University of Pennsylvania Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moonwomon-Baird, B. (1997). Toward the study of lesbian speech. In A. Livia and K. Hall (eds.), Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender and Sexuality. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Morgan, R., & Wood, K. (1995). Lesbians in the living room: Collusion, co-narration in conversation. In W. L. Leap (ed.), Beyond the Lavender Lexicon: Authenticity, Imagination, and Appropriation in Lesbian and Gay Languages. Amsterdam:Gordon and Breach.Google Scholar
Morrish, E. (2002). The case of the indefinite pronoun: Discourse and the concealment of lesbian identity in class. In L. Litosseliti & J. Sunderland (eds.), Gender Identity and Discourse Analysis. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Mullany, L. (2007). Gendered Discourses in Professional Communication. Oxford:Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nagle, J. (1995). Framing radical bisexuality: Toward a gender agenda. In N. Tucker (ed.), Bisexual Politics: Theories, Queries, and Visions. New York:Haworth Press.Google Scholar
Nakamura, K. (2001). Gender and language use in Japanese preschool children. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 34 (1), 15–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Neumann, D. (1992). How mediation can effectively address the male–female power imbalance in divorce. Mediation Quarterly, 9 (3), 227–39.Google Scholar
Newman, L. K. (2000). Transgender issues. In J. Ussher (ed.), Women's Health: Contemporary International Perspectives. Leicester:BPS Books.Google Scholar
Nilan, P. (1995). Membership categorization devices under construction: Social identity boundary maintenance in everyday discourse. Australian Review of Applied Linguistics, 18 (1), 69–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norrick, N. R. (1997). Twice-told tales: Collaborative narration of familiar stories. Language in Society, 26, 199–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ochs, E. (1992). Indexing gender. In A. Duranti & C. Goodwin (eds.), Rethinking Context. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Osvaldsson, K. (2004). ‘I don't have no damn cultures’: Doing normality in a deviant setting. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 1, 239–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parks, J. B., & Roberton, M. A. (2008). Generation gaps in attitudes toward sexist/nonsexist language. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 27 (3), 276–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pauwels, A. (1998). Women Changing Language. Harlow:Addison Wesley Longman.Google Scholar
Pellegrino, M. J. (1997). Fibromyalgia: Managing the Pain (2nd ed.). Columbus, OH:Anadem.Google Scholar
Pichler, P. (2009). Talking Young Femininities. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pichler, P., & Eppler, E. M. (eds.) (2009). Gender and Spoken Interaction. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plug, L. (2006). Speed and reduction in postpositioned self-initiated self-repair. York Papers in Linguistics Series 2, 6, 143–62.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, A. (1975). Second assessments: A study of some features of agreements/disagreements. Unpublished PhD dissertation, Division of Social Sciences, University of California, Irvine.
Pomerantz, A. (1978). Compliment responses: Notes on the co-operation of multiple constraints. In J. Schenkein (ed.), Studies in the Organization of Conversational Interaction. London:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, A. (1980). Telling my side: ‘Limited access’ as a fishing device. Sociological Inquiry, 50 (3 and 4), 186–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pomerantz, A. (1984a). Agreeing and disagreeing with assessments: Some features of preferred/dispreferred turn shapes. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, A. (1984b). Giving a source or basis: The practice in conversation of telling ‘how I know’. Journal of Pragmatics, 8 (5–6), 607–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pomerantz, A. (1984c). Pursuing a response. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, A. (1986). Extreme case formulations: A new way of legitimating claims. Human Studies, 9, 219–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pomerantz, A., & Mandelbaum, J. (2005). A conversation analytic approach to relationships: Their relevance for interactional conduct. In K. Fitch & R. E. Sanders (eds.), Handbook of Language and Social Interaction. Mahwah, NJ:Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Potter, J. (1996). Representing Reality. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Potter, J., & Hepburn, A. (2003). ‘I'm a bit concerned’: Call openings on a child protection helpline. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 36, 197–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Potter, J., & Hepburn, A. (2011). Somewhere between evil and normal: Traces of morality in a child protection helpline. In J. Cromdal & M. Tholander (eds.), Morality in Practice: Exploring Childhood, Parenthood and Schooling in Everyday Life. London:Equinox.Google Scholar
Precht, K. (2008). Sex similarities and differences in stance in informal American conversation. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 12 (1), 89–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Press for Change (2007). Response to draft good practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of gender dysphoria. www.pfc.org.uk. Accessed January 2009.
Qvortrup, J. (2005). Studies in Modern Childhood: Society, Agency, Culture. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Raymond, G. (2003). Grammar and social organisation: Yes/no interrogatives and the structure of responding. American Sociological Review, 68, 939–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Raymond, G., & Heritage, J. (2006). The epistemics of social relationships: Owning grandchildren. Language in Society, 35 (5), 677–705.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Regehr, C. (1994). The use of empowerment in child custody mediation: A feminist critique. Mediation Quarterly, 11 (4), 361–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Remlinger, K. (1999). Widening the lens of language and gender research: Integrating critical discourse analysis and cultural practice theory. Linguistik Online, 2 (1/99), 1–14.Google Scholar
Robinson, J. D. (2004). The sequential organization of ‘explicit’ apologies in naturally occurring English. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 37 (3), 291–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robinson, J. D. (2005). The concept of trouble responsibility in conversational repair and its implications for interactional organization and interpersonal alignment. Unpublished paper, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA.
Robinson, J. D., & Heritage, J. (2006). Physicians' opening questions and patients' satisfaction. Patient Education and Counseling, 60, 279–85.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rose, S., & Frieze, I. H. (1989). Young singles' scripts for a first date. Gender and Sexuality, 28 (9–10), 258–68.Google Scholar
Ryave, A. L. (1978). On the achievement of a series of stories. In J. Schenkein (ed.), Studies in the Organization of Conversational Interaction. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1966). The search for help: No one to turn to. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, Berkeley.
Sacks, H. (1972). On the analysability of stories by children. In J. Gumperz & D. Hymes (eds.), Directions in Sociolinguistics: The Ethnography of Communication. New York:Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1974). An analysis of the course of a joke's telling in conversation. In R. Bauman & J. Sherzer (eds.), Explorations in the Ethnography of Speaking. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1975). Everyone has to lie. In M. Sanches & B. Blount (eds.), Sociocultural Dimensions of Language Use. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1978). Some technical considerations of a dirty joke. In J. Schenkein (ed.), Studies in the Organization of Conversational Interaction. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1979). A revolutionary category: Hotrodder. In G. Psathas (ed.), Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology. New York:Irvington.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1984a). Notes on methodology (ed. G. Jefferson). In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1984b). On doing ‘being ordinary’. In J. M. Atkinson & J. Heritage (eds.), Structures of Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1987 [1973]). On the preferences for agreement and contiguity in sequences in conversation. In G. Button & J. R. E. Lee (eds.), Talk and Social Organisation. Clevedon:Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Sacks, H. (1992). Lectures on Conversation (Vols. I and II, ed. G. Jefferson). Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Sacks, H., & Schegloff, E. A. (1979). Two preferences in the organization of reference to persons in conversation and their interaction. In G. Psathas (ed.), Everyday Language: Studies in Ethnomethodology. New York:Irvington.Google Scholar
Sacks, H., Schegloff, E. A., & Jefferson, G. (1974). A simplest systematics for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language, 50 (4), 696–735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sanden, I., Linell, P., Startkammar, H., & Larsson, U. S. (2001). Routinization and sensitivity: Interaction in oncological follow-up consultations. Health, 5 (2), 139–63.Google Scholar
Saposnek, D. T. (1983). Mediating Child Custody Disputes. San Francisco:Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (n. d.). Increments. Unpublished manuscript.
Schegloff, E. A. (1972). Notes on a conversational practice: Formulating place. In D. N. Sudnow (ed.), Studies in Social Interaction. New York:Free Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1979). The relevance of repair to syntax-for-conversation. In T. Givon (ed.), Syntax and Semantics 12: Discourse and Syntax. New York:Academic Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1980). Preliminaries to preliminaries: Can I ask you a question? Sociological Inquiry, 50 (4), 104–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1986). The routine as achievement. Human Studies, 9, 111–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1987a). Between micro and macro: Contexts and other connections. In J. Alexander, B. Giesen, R. Munch, & N. Smelser (eds.), The Micro–Macro Link. Berkeley:University of California Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1987b). Analyzing single episodes of interaction: An exercise in conversation analysis. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50 (2), 101–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1990). On the organization of sequences as a source of ‘coherence’ in talk-in-interaction. In B. Dorval (ed.), Conversational Organization and its Development (Vol. XXXVIII in the series Advances in Discourse Processes). Norwood, NJ:Ablex.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1991). Reflections on talk and social structure. In D. Boden & D. Zimmerman (eds.), Talk and Social Structure. Berkeley:University of California Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1992a). In another context. In A. Duranti & C. Goodwin (eds.), Rethinking Context: Language as an Interactive Phenomenon. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1992b). Repair after next turn: The last structurally provided defense of intersubjectivity in conversation. American Journal of Sociology, 97 (5), 1295–345.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1993). Reflections on quantification in the study of conversation. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 26 (1), 99–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1996a). Issues of relevance for discourse analysis: Contingency in action, interaction and co-participant context. In E. H. Hovy & D. R. Scott (eds.), Computational and Conversational Discourse: Burning Issues – An Interdisciplinary Account. New York:Springer.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1996b). Turn organization: One intersection of grammar and interaction. In E. Ochs, S. Thompson, & E. A. Schegloff (eds.), Interaction and Grammar. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1996c). Some practices for referring to persons in talk-in-interaction: A partial sketch of a systematics. In B. Fox (ed.), Studies in Anaphora. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1997). Whose text? Whose context? Discourse and Society, 8 (2), 165–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (1998a). Reply to Wetherell. Discourse and Society, 9, 413–16.
Schegloff, E. A. (1998b). Reflections on studying prosody in talk-in-interaction. Language and Speech, 41 (3–4), 235–63.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schegloff, E. A. (1999). ‘Schegloff's texts’ as ‘Billig's data’: A critical reply. Discourse and Society, 10 (4), 558–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2001a). Accounts of conduct in interaction: Interruption, overlap, and turn-taking. In J. H. Turner (ed.), Handbook of Sociological Theory. New York:Kluwer Academic/Plenum.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2001b). Getting serious: Joke serious ‘no’. Journal of Pragmatics, 33 (12), 1947–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2004). On dispensability. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 37 (2), 95–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2007a). Sequence Organization in Interaction: A Primer in Conversation Analysis. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2007b). A tutorial on membership categorization. Journal of Pragmatics, 39, 462–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2007c). Conveying who you are: The presentation of self, strictly speaking. In N. Enfield & T. Stivers (eds.), Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2007d). Categories in action: Person-reference and membership categorization. Discourse Studies, 9, 433–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2007e). Interaction: The infrastructure for social institutions, the natural ecological niche for language, and the arena in which culture is enacted. In N. J. Enfield & S. C. Levinson (eds.), Roots of Human Sociality: Culture, Cognition and Interaction. London:Berg.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A. (2009). One perspective on conversation analysis: Comparative perspectives. In J. Sidnell (ed.), Conversation Analysis: Comparative Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E. A., & Sacks, H. (1973). Opening up closings. Semiotica, 7, 289–327.Google Scholar
Schegloff, E.A., Jefferson, G., & Sacks, H. (1977). The preference for self-correction in the organization of repair in conversation. Language, 53 (2), 361–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schleef, E. (2008). Gender and academic discourse: Global restrictions and local possibilities. Language in Society, 37, 515–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schofield, J. W. (1981). Complementary and conflicting identities: Images and interaction in an interracial school. In S. R. Asher & J. M. Gottman (eds.), The Development of Children's Friendships. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Schutz, A. (1962). Alfred Schutz: Collected Papers. Vol. I: The Problem of Social Reality. The Hague:Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
Schutz, A. (1973 [1953]). Common-sense and scientific interpretation of human action. In M. Natanson (ed.), Alfred Schutz: Collected Papers. Vol. I: The Problem of Social Reality. The Hague:Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
Sclater, S. D. (2003). What is the subject? Narrative Inquiry, 13 (2), 317–30.Google Scholar
Scott, J. W. (1986). Gender: A useful category of histoical analysis. American Historical Review, 91 (5), 1053–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sharrock, W. (1974). On owning knowledge. In R. Turner (ed.), Ethnomethodology: Selected Readings. Harmondsworth:Penguin.Google Scholar
Shaw, R., & Kitzinger, C. (2007). Memory in interaction: An analysis of repeat cells to a home birth helpline. Research on Language and Social Interaction, 40 (1), 117–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, S. (2000). Language, gender and floor apportionment in political debates. Discourse and Society, 11 (3), 401–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sidnell, J. (2003). Constructing and managing male exclusivity in talk-in-interaction. In J. Holmes & M. Meyerhoff (eds.), The Handbook of Language and Gender. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Siewierska, A. (2005). Gender distinctions in independent personal pronouns. In M. Haspelmath, M. S. Dryer, D. Gil, & B. Comrie (eds.), The World Atlas of Language Structures. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Smith, D. E. (1978). K is mentally ill: The anatomy of a factual account. Sociology, 12, 23–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (1999). Feminism and conversation analysis: An oxymoron? Feminism and Psychology, 9 (4), 417–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2001). Reconsidering the concept of hegemonic masculinity: Discursive psychology, conversation analysis and participants' orientations. Feminism and Psychology, 11 (1), 107–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2002a). What can conversation analysis contribute to feminist methodology? Putting reflexivity into practice. Discourse and Society, 13, 783–803.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2002b). Sexist talk: Gender categories, participants' orientation and irony. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 6 (3), 347–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2002c). ‘Natural’ and ‘contrived’ data: A sustainable distinction? Discourse Studies, 4 (4), 511–25.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2005a). Gender Talk: Feminism, Discourse and Conversation Analysis. London:Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2005b). The interactional organization of the gender attribution process. Sociology, 39 (1), 67–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2007). Natural and contrived data. In In P. Alasuutari, J. Brannen, & L. Bickman (eds.), The Handbook of Social Research. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2009). Passing as a transsexual woman in the gender identity clinic. In M. Wetherell (ed.), Theorizing Identities and Social Action. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A. (2010). Pursuing views and testing commitments: Hypothetical questions in the psychiatric assessment of transsexual patients. In A. Freed & S. Ehrlich (eds.), Why Do You Ask? The Function of Questions in Institutional Discourse. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A. (forthcoming). The epistemics of self-praise.
Speer, S. A., & Green, R. (2007). On passing: The interactional organization of appearance attributions in the psychiatric assessment of transsexual patients. In V. Clarke & E. Peel (eds.), Out in Psychology: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer Perspectives. Chichester:John Wiley.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A., & Green, R. (2008). Transsexual Identities: Constructions of Gender in an NHS Gender Identity Clinic. End of Award report. Award No:RES-148–25–0029. London: Economic and Social Research Council.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A., & Parsons, C. (2006). Gatekeeping gender: Some features of the use of hypothetical questions in the psychiatric assessment of transsexual patients. Discourse and Society, 17 (6), 785–812.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A., & Parsons, C. (2007). ‘Suppose you couldn't go any further with treatment, what would you do?’: Hypothetical questions in interactions between psychiatrists and transsexual patients. In A. Hepburn & S. Wiggins (eds.), Discursive Research in Practice: New Approaches to Psychology and Interaction. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Speer, S. A., & Potter, J. (2000). The management of heterosexist talk: Conversational resources and prejudiced claims. Discourse and Society, 11 (4), 543–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Speer, S. A., & Potter, J. (2002). From performatives to practices: Judith Butler, discursive psychology, and the management of heterosexist talk. In P. McIlvenny (ed.), Talking Gender and Sexuality: Conversation, Performativity and Discourse in Interaction. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Spender, D. (1980). Man Made Language. London:Pandora Press.Google Scholar
Stivers, T. (2007). Alternative recognitionals in person reference. In N. J. Enfield & T. Stivers (eds.), Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Stivers, T., Mangione-Smith, R., Elliott, M., McDonald, L., & Heritage, J. (2003). Why do physicians think parents expect antibiotics? What parents report vs what physicians believe. Journal of Family Practice, 52 (2), 140–8.Google ScholarPubMed
Stivers, T., Enfield, N. J., & Levinson, S. C. (2007). Person reference in interaction. In N. J. Enfield & T. Stivers (eds.), Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Stockill, C. (2007). Use of alternative (non-)recognitionals: A marked practice to display social distance. Paper presented at the International Pragmatics Association Conference, Goteborg, Sweden, July.
Stockill, C., & Kitzinger, C. (2007). Gendered ‘people’: How linguistically non-gendered terms can have gendered interactional relevance. Feminism and Psychology, 17 (2), 224–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (1997). An evaluation of two studies of gender and language in educational settings. Gender and Education, 9 (2), 233–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (1998). Talking about gender: The conversational construction of gender categories in academic discourse. Discourse and Society, 9 (2), 217–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2000). Toward a conversation analytic approach to gender and discourse. Feminism and Psychology, 10 (4), 552–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2003). Mothers, single women and sluts: Gender, morality and membership categorization in neighbour disputes. Feminism and Psychology, 13 (3), 317–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2004). Gender and discourse, gender and categorization: Current developments in language and gender research. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 1 (2), 107–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2005). Analysing gender and language. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 9 (1), 118–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2006). On ethnomethodology, feminism, and the analysis of categorial reference to gender in talk-in-interaction. Sociological Review, 54 (3), 467–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2008a). Categories and sequences: Formulating gender in talk-in-interaction. In K. Harrington, L. Litosseliti, H. Saunston, & J. Sunderland (eds.), Gender and Language Research Methodologies. Basingstoke:Palgrave.Google Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2008b). Dispreferred actions and other interactional breaches as devices for occasioning audience laughter in television ‘sitcoms’. Social Semiotics, 18 (3), 289–307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H. (2009). Doing actions with identity categories: Complaints and denials in neighbour disputes. Text and Talk, 29 (1), 75–97.Google Scholar
Stokoe, E., & Edwards, D. (2007). ‘Black this, black that’: Racial insults and reported speech in neighbour complaints and police interrogations. Discourse and Society, 18 (3), 337–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E., & Edwards, D. (2011). Mundane morality and gender in familial neighbour disputes. In J. Cromdal & M. Tholander (eds.), Morality in Practice: Exploring Childhood, Parenthood and Schooling in Everyday Life. London:Equinox.Google Scholar
Stokoe, E. H., & Smithson, J. (2001). Making gender relevant: Conversation analysis and gender categories in interaction. Discourse and Society, 12 (2), 243–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H., & Smithson, J. (2002). Gender and sexuality in talk-in-interaction: Considering a conversation analytic perspective. In P. McIlvenny (ed.), Talking Gender and Sexuality. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Stokoe, E. H., & Weatherall, A. (2002a). Gender, language, conversation analysis and feminism. Discourse and Society, 13 (6), 707–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stokoe, E. H., & Weatherall, A. (eds.) (2002b). Gender, language, conversation analysis and feminism. Discourse and Society (special issue), 13 (6).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Streeck, J. (1986). Towards reciprocity: Politics, rank and gender in the interaction of a group of schoolchildren. In J. Cook-Gumperz, W. A. Corsaro, & J. Streeck (eds.), Children's Worlds and Children's Language. Berlin:Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Stringer, J. L., & Hopper, R. (1998). Generic he in conversation? Quarterly Journal of Speech, 84, 209–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sunderland, J. (2004). Gendered Discourses. Basingstoke:Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sunderland, J. (ed.) (2006). Language and Gender: An Advanced Resource Book. London:Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Swann, J. (1992). Girls, Boys and Language. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Swann, J. (2009). Doing gender against the odds: A sociolinguistic analysis of educational discourse. In P. Pichler & E. M. Eppler (eds.), Gender and Spoken Interaction. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Tainio, L. (2003). ‘When shall we go for a ride?’: A case of the sexual harassment of a young girl. Discourse and Society, 14 (2), 173–90.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Talbot, M. M. (1998). Language and Gender: An Introduction. Cambridge:Polity.Google Scholar
Tannen, D. (1990). You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation. London:Virago.Google Scholar
Tannen, D. (ed.) (1993). Gender and Conversational Interaction. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Tannen, D. (1994). Gender and Discourse. New York:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Tannen, D. (1997). Women and men talking: An interactional sociolinguistic approach. In M. R. Walsh (ed.), Women, Men, and Gender: Ongoing Debates. New Haven, CT:Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Tannen, D. (1998). Talk in the intimate relationship: His and hers. In J. Coates (ed.), Language and Gender: A Reader. Oxford:Blackwell.Google Scholar
Tavris, C. (1994). Reply to Brown and Gilligan. Feminism and Psychology, 4 (3), 350–2.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Terasaki, A. K. (2004). Pre-announcement sequences in conversation. In G. H. Lerner (ed.), Conversation Analysis: Studies from the First Generation. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Tholander, M. (2002). Cross-gender teasing as a socializing practice. Discourse Processes, 34, 311–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thorne, B. (1993). Gender Play: Girls and Boys in School. Buckingham:Open University Press.Google Scholar
Thorne, B., & Henley, N. (eds.) (1975). Language and Sex: Difference and Dominance. Rowley, MA:Newbury House.Google Scholar
Thorne, B., Kramarae, C., & Henley, N. (eds.) (1983). Language, Gender and Society. Rowley, MA:Newbury House.Google Scholar
Tjosvold, D., & van de Vliert, E. (1994). Applying cooperation and competitive conflict theory to mediation. Mediation Quarterly, 11 (4), 303–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Toerien, M., & Kitzinger, C. (2007). Emotional labour in action: Navigating multiple involvements in the beauty salon. Sociology, 41 (4), 645–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Toerien, M., & Wilkinson, S. (2003). Gender and body hair: Constructing the feminine woman. Women's Studies International Forum, 26, 333–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tracy, K. (1998). Analysing context: Framing the discussion. Research in Language and Social Interaction, 31 (1), 1–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Turk, M. J. (2007). Self-referential gestures in conversation. Discourse and Society, 9, 561–9.Google Scholar
Uchida, A. (1992). When ‘difference’ is ‘dominance’: A critique of the ‘anti-power-based’ cultural approach to sex differences. Language and Society, 21, 547–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Velody, I., & Williams, R. (1998). Introduction. In I. Velody & R. Williams (eds.), The Politics of Constructionism. London:Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wall, J. A. (1981). Mediation: An analysis, review, and proposed research. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 16, 51–65.Google Scholar
Walsh, C. (2001). Gender and Discourse: Language and Power in Politics, the Church and Organizations. Harlow:Pearson Education.Google Scholar
Watson, D. R. (1978). Categorization, authorization and blame negotiation in conversation. Sociology, 5, 105–13.Google Scholar
Watson, D. R., & Weinberg, T. S. (1982). Interviews and the interactional construction of accounts of homosexual identity. Social Analysis, 11, 56–78.Google Scholar
Weatherall, A. (2000). Gender relevance in talk-in-interaction and discourse. Discourse and Society, 11 (2), 286–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weatherall, A. (2002a). Gender, Language and Discourse. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
Weatherall, A. (2002b). Towards understanding gender and talk-in-interaction. Discourse and Society, 13 (6), 767–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, C. (1984). Not just ‘doctor's orders’: Directive–response sequences in patients' visits to women and men physicians. Discourse and Society, 1, 85–112.Google Scholar
West, C. (1995). Women's competence in conversation. Discourse and Society, 6 (1), 107–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, C., & Fenstermaker, S. (1993). Power, inequality, and the accomplishment of gender: An ethnomethodological view. In P. England (ed.), Theory on Gender/Feminism on Theory. New York:Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
West, C., & Fenstermaker, S. (1995). Doing difference. Gender and Society, 9 (1), 8–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, C., & Fenstermaker, S. (2002a). Accountability in action: The accomplishment of gender, race and class in a University of California Board of Regents. Discourse and Society, 13 (4), 537–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, C., & Fenstermaker, S. (2002b). Accountability and affirmative action: The accomplishment of gender, race, and class in a University of California Board of Regents Meeting. In S. Fenstermaker & C. West (eds.), Doing Gender, Doing Difference: Inequality, Power, and Institutional Change. London:Routledge.Google Scholar
West, C., & Garcia, A. (1988). Conversational shift work: A study of topical transitions between women and men. Social Problems, 35, 551–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, C., & Zimmerman, D. H. (1987). Doing gender. Gender and Society, 1, 125–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, C., & Zimmerman, D. H. (2009). Account for doing gender. Gender and Society, 23 (1), 112–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wetherell, M. (1998). Positioning and interpretative repertoires: Conversation analysis and post-structuralism in dialogue. Discourse and Society, 9 (3), 431–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wetherell, M. (2007). A step too far: Discursive psychology, linguistic ethnography and questions of identity. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 11 (5), 661–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wetherell, M., & Edley, N. (1999). Negotiating hegemonic masculinity: Imaginary positions and psycho-discursive practices. Feminism and Psychology, 9, 335–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whalen, J., Zimmerman, D. H., & Whalen, M. (1988). When words fail: A single case analysis. Social Problems, 35 (4), 335–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
White, S. (2002). ‘Accomplishing the case’ in pediatrics and child health: Medicine and morality in inter-professional talk. Sociology of Health and Illness, 24 (4), 409–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whitehead, K. A., & Lerner, G. H. (2009). When are persons ‘white’? On some practical asymmetries of racial reference in talk-in-interaction. Discourse and Society, 20 (5), 613–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wickes, R., & Emmison, M. (2007). They are all ‘doing gender’ but are they all passing? A case study of the appropriation of a sociological concept. Sociological Review, 55 (2), 311–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Widdicombe, S. (1998). ‘But you don't class yourself’: The interactional management of membership and non-membership. In C. Antaki & S. Widdicombe (eds.), Identities in Talk. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Wilkinson, S., & Kitzinger, C. (2003). Constructing identities: A feminist conversation analytic approach to positioning in action. In R. Harré & F. Moghaddam (eds.), The Self and Others: Positioning Individuals and Groups in Personal, Political, and Cultural Contexts. Westpost, CT:Praeger.Google Scholar
Wilkinson, S., & Kitzinger, C. (2006). Surprise as an interactional achievement: Reaction tokens in conversation. Social Psychology Quarterly, 69 (2), 150–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilkinson, S., & Kitzinger, C. (2007). Conversation analysis, gender and sexuality. In A. Weatherall, B. Watson, & C. Gallios (eds.), Language, Discourse and Social Psychology. London:Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
Williams, J. (2000). Unbending Gender: Why Work and Family Conflict and What To Do About It. Oxford:Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Wodak, R. (ed.). (1997). Gender and Discourse. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Wodak, R. (2001). The discourse-historical approach. In R. Wodak & M. Meyer (eds.), Methods of Critical Discourse Analysis. London:Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wooffitt, R. (2005). Conversation Analysis and Discourse Analysis: A Comparative and Critical Introduction. London:Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wowk, M. T. (1984). Blame allocation, sex and gender in a murder interrogation. Women's Studies International Forum, 7 (1), 75–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wowk, M. T. (2007). Kitzinger's feminist conversation analysis: Critical observations. Human Studies, 30, 131–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wu, R. (2004). Stance in Talk: A Conversation Analysis of Mandarin Final Particles. Amsterdam:John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zimmerman, D. H. (1992a). They were all doing gender, but they weren't all passing: Comment on Rogers. Gender and Society, 6 (2), 192–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zimmerman, D. H. (1992b). The interactional organization of calls for emergency assistance. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (eds.), Talk at Work: Interaction in Institutional Settings. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Zimmerman, D. H. (1998). Identity, context, and interaction. In C. Antaki and S. Widdicombe (eds.), Identities in Talk. London:Sage.Google Scholar
Zimmerman, D. H., & West, C. (1975). Sex roles, interruptions and silences in conversation. In B. Thorne & N. Henley (eds.), Language and Sex: Difference and Dominance. Rowley, MA:Newbury House.Google Scholar