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Case 25 - Remembering without Knowing

from Part 5 - Difficult-to-Characterize Cognitive/Behavioral Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 November 2020

Keith Josephs
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Federico Rodriguez-Porcel
Affiliation:
Medical University of South Carolina
Rhonna Shatz
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
Daniel Weintraub
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Alberto Espay
Affiliation:
University of Cincinnati
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Summary

This 65-year-old right-handed man presented with worsening “memory” problems for the past 5 years. He first noticed increasing difficulties with performing previously well-known and simple repairs at home, such as changing a light switch. A neuropsychological evaluation was reportedly normal. More recently, his family noticed declining skills in driving and use of appliances. In addition, performance of other tasks, such as preparing coffee, was affected by pauses and unnecessary steps. More recently, he was forgetful about recent events and unintentionally repetitive. There were no word-finding or navigation difficulties. On exam, he did not appear to be concerned about his impairments and inappropriately joked about them. His speech was fluent with occasional word-finding difficulties. He displayed optic ataxia and oculomotor apraxia, as well as simultanagnosia.

Type
Chapter
Information
Common Pitfalls in Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 80 - 82
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Ahmed, S. et al. 2016. Utility of testing for apraxia and associated features in dementia. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 87(11) 11581162.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Heilman, K. M. 2010. Apraxia. Continuum 16(4) 8698.Google ScholarPubMed
Leiguarda, R. C. and Marsden, C. D. 2000. Limb apraxias: higher-order disorders of sensorimotor integration. Brain 123(Pt 5) 860879.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mozaz, M. et al. 2006. Posture recognition in Alzheimer’s disease. Brain Cogn 62(3) 241245.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Osiurak, F. and Gall, D. 2012. Apraxia: Clinical Types, Theoretical Models, and Evaluation. Rijeka, Croatia: Neuroscience InTech.Google Scholar
Zadikoff, C. and Lang, A. E. 2005. Apraxia in movement disorders. Brain 128(Pt 7) 14801497.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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