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14 - Regional approaches to global climate change policy in sub-Saharan Africa

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2009

Ian H. Rowlands
Affiliation:
University of Waterloo, Canada
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Summary

Keywords

Global climate change policy; global climate change response strategies; regional cooperation; regional organizations; sub-Saharan Africa

Abstarct

This chapter examines the potential for different regional approaches in response to global climate change challenges in sub-Saharan Africa. Working together, governments, businesses, non-governmental organizations and/or other groups in two or more neighbouring countries could develop response strategies that would benefit both the global climate and local development in Africa. In this chapter, the following possible regional response strategies are presented and investigated: countries working together as a regional actor in international negotiations; regional strategies to adapt to global climate change; regional mitigation strategies; and the development of knowledge at the regional level. Of course, not every possible regional approach to global climate change policy will be desirable. Nevertheless, by presenting a broad range of possibilities, this chapter aims to stimulate interest in, and further research on, regional approaches to global climate change policy in sub-Saharan Africa.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this chapter is to examine the potential for different regional approaches in response to global climate change challenges in sub-Saharan Africa. The argument advanced is that it is in African decision makers' interests to complement the usual focus upon national approaches with a consideration of how regional approaches could be part of a broader portfolio of climate change responses. To investigate this potential, the chapter proceeds in five main sections.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

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