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27 - Sustainability as a Driver of Organizational Change

from Part III - Implications for Talent Management and Impact on Employees

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2020

Brian J. Hoffman
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
Mindy K. Shoss
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
Lauren A. Wegman
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
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Summary

Discussions of the changing nature of work would be incomplete without a consideration of the changing role of the private sector in sustainable development, which affects what companies are working toward and how they are accomplishing their aims. This chapter considers and illustrates how the private sector can contribute to the accomplishment of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Opportunities for impact extend beyond traditional forms of Corporate Social Responsibility. Enabling companies to embed people-friendly, planet-sensitive policies and practices in ways that are good for business can propel the positive transformation needed to achieve the SDGs. This leads to questions of how to create such enabling environments. Answers require a keen understanding not only of businesses, but of the people who lead, comprise, and support them. As such, the behavioral and organizational sciences are key to facilitating the kinds of private sector contributions necessary to accomplish the SDGs.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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