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19 - The Roles of Emotion in Relationships

from Part V - Basic Processes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2018

Anita L. Vangelisti
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Daniel Perlman
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Greensboro
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Summary

Romantic partners do not always abide by expectations for loving relationships. Because romantic involvements often satisfy needs for connection, security, and intimacy, it becomes deeply painful when partners become aggressive. This chapter reviews existing theory and research on the causes, nature, and consequences of partner aggression, and critically examines existing theoretical frameworks and assumptions about typologies and gender differences. We discuss the relational context of partner aggression, such as the role of dependence, commitment, and cognitive processes that may lead individuals to justify remaining in an aggressive relationship. Individuals may fail to recognize the harm caused by verbal and emotional aggression. Finally, we discuss the efficacy of efforts to reduce partner aggression, and conclude by suggesting that a greater understanding of partner aggression may empower individuals to make effective relationship choices that address their needs.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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