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24 - Computational Models in Personality and Social Psychology

from Part IV - Computational Modeling in Various Cognitive Fields

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2023

Ron Sun
Affiliation:
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York
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Summary

This is a relatively comprehensive review of computational modeling work in social psychology and personality psychology, from the beginning of computer modeling in this area in the early sixties, shortly after the founding of artificial intelligence, to the current day.Among the major topics covered are social perception, group perception and stereotyping, attitudes and attitude change, social influence, group behavior, such as group formation and gossip, human mating strategies, culture, the self, and personality. The major modeling techniques used in this area are connectionist models and multi-agent systems.Occasionally researchers use mathematical models.Connectionist models are typically used to simulate intrapersonal processes, such as social perception and attitude change, whereas cellular automata and multi-agent models are typically used to simulate interpersonal processes, such as social influence, gossip, culture, and human mating strategies.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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