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185 - Canonization and Obsolescence: Classic Translations versus Retranslations

from Part XIX - Translation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

Sources cited

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Further reading

Hoenselaars, Ton. “Between Heaven and Hell: Shakespearian Translation, Adaptation, and Criticism from a Historical Perspective.” The Yearbook of English Studies 36 (2006): 5064.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoenselaars, Ton, ed. Shakespeare and the Language of Translation. London: Thomson Learning, 2004.Google Scholar
Lambert, José. “Théorie de la littérature et théorie de la traduction en France (1800–1850): inteprétées à partir de la théorie du polysystème.” Poetics Today 4 (1981): 161–70.Google Scholar
La Place, Pierre-Antoine. “Discours du théâtre anglois.” Le théâtre anglois. Vol. 1. Paris: n.p., 1745.Google Scholar
Larson, Kenneth E.The Shakespeare Canon in France, Germany, and England, 1700–1776: Some Preliminary Considerations.” Michigan Germanic Studies 15 (1989): 114–35.Google Scholar
Lefevere, André, ed. Translation, History, Culture: A Sourcebook. London: Routledge, 1992.Google Scholar
Le Tourneur, Pierre. Préface du “Shakespeare traduit de l’anglois.” Ed. Gury, Jacques. Geneva: Droz, 1990.Google Scholar
Procházka, Martin, and Čermák, Jan, eds. Shakespeare between the Middle Ages and Modernism: From Translator’s Art to Academic Discourse. Prague: Charles University, 2008.Google Scholar
Pujante, Ángel Luis, and Hoenselaars, Ton, eds. Four Hundred Years of Shakespeare in Europe. Newark: U of Delaware P, 2003.Google Scholar
Willems, Michèle. “The Mouse and the Urn: Re-Visions of Shakespeare from Voltaire to Ducis.” Shakespeare Survey 60 (2007): 214–22.Google Scholar

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