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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2022

Paul Crosthwaite
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Peter Knight
Affiliation:
University of Manchester
Nicky Marsh
Affiliation:
University of Southampton
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Print publication year: 2022

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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Paul Crosthwaite, University of Edinburgh, Peter Knight, University of Manchester, Nicky Marsh, University of Southampton
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Economics
  • Online publication: 28 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009026550.022
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  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Paul Crosthwaite, University of Edinburgh, Peter Knight, University of Manchester, Nicky Marsh, University of Southampton
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Economics
  • Online publication: 28 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009026550.022
Available formats
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Paul Crosthwaite, University of Edinburgh, Peter Knight, University of Manchester, Nicky Marsh, University of Southampton
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Economics
  • Online publication: 28 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009026550.022
Available formats
×