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6 - The Constitution of the Republic of India

from Part II - Historical Experiences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2019

Roger Masterman
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Robert Schütze
Affiliation:
University of Durham
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Summary

The Constitution of India, adopted in 1949 and still in force today, was one of the earliest post-colonial Constitutions. Where the constitutional systems of most other newly independent states of the 1960s and 1970s have been marked by revolution, constitutional repeal and suspension, the Indian Constitution is remarkable for its durability. In fact, there are only a handful of states, with or without a colonial history, whose Constitutions have proved more resilient. The Indian Constitution is also the longest Constitution in the world, with the original draft consisting of 395 articles, eight schedules and a huge amount of administrative detail. There have also been 101 Amendments to the Constitution.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Austin, G., Working a Democratic Constitution: A History of the Indian Constitution (Oxford University Press, 2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Austin, G., The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a Nation (Oxford University Press, 1999).Google Scholar
Choudhry, S., Khosla, M. and Mehta, P.B., The Oxford Handbook of the Indian Constitution (Oxford University Press, 2016).Google Scholar
Krishnaswamy, S., Democracy and Constitutionalism in India: A Study of the Basic Structure Doctrine (Oxford University Press, 2011).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sathe, S.P., Judicial Activism in India: Transgressing Borders and Enforcing Limits (Oxford University Press, 2002).Google Scholar
Seervai, H.M., Constitutional Law of India (Universal Law Publishing Company, 2004).Google Scholar
Thiruvengandam, A.K., The Constitution of India (Constitutional Systems of the World Series) (Bloomsbury, 2017).Google Scholar

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