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Chapter 24 - Publishers

from Part III - Performance and Publishing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2019

Natasha Loges
Affiliation:
Royal College of Music, London
Katy Hamilton
Affiliation:
Royal College of Music, London
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Summary

Since Brahms only had a salaried position for brief periods (as choral director in Detmold, 1857–9, director of the Vienna Singakademie 1863–4 and artistic director of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde 1871–5), he had to support himself primarily by other means. Apart from concert fees, he relied on the honoraria his publishers paid him and did not receive royalties. Indeed, his relationships with his publishers are a means of tracing his stratospheric career trajectory. As a young man, Brahms was forced to tout his works to publishers and enter into protracted and wearying negotiations, which jarred against his artistic principles. In later years, he was a universally courted composer who could determine the conditions under which his work would be published. In fact, after 1869, it was virtually only one publisher, Fritz Simrock, who issued all of Brahms’s new works.

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Brahms in Context , pp. 236 - 245
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Joelson-Strohbach, H., ‘Vom Winterthurer Musikverleger Jakob Melchior Rieter-Biedermann’, Librarium: Zeitschrift der Schweizerischen Bibliophilen-Gesellschaft 34 (1991), 5166Google Scholar
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Lawford-Hinrichsen, I.. Music Publishing and Patronage: C. F. Peters: 1800 to the Holocaust (Kenton: Edition Press, 2000)Google Scholar
Schmitz, P., Johannes Brahms und der Leipziger Musikverlag Breitkopf & Härtel (Göttingen: V & R Unipress, 2009)Google Scholar
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