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Chapter 14 - Private Music-Making

from Part II - Identities, Environments and Influences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2019

Natasha Loges
Affiliation:
Royal College of Music, London
Katy Hamilton
Affiliation:
Royal College of Music, London
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Summary

It is difficult to overestimate the importance of private musical activity as a testing ground, a compositional setting and, indeed, as a pleasurable activity for Brahms. ‘Private music-making’ deserves a word of explanation first, since private spaces were not always in the home, performers were not always amateurs and repertoire was not strictly divided according to public or private consumption. While Brahms was clearly often concerned to write music suitable for amateur performers, such repertoire was not automatically excluded from the concert platform as a result. Indeed, since the public lied recital was an innovation during his lifetime, some of the pieces which had previously found readier advocates in the domestic space were pushed further into the limelight thanks to pioneering programmers such as Gustav Walter and Amalie Joachim [see Ch. 19 ‘Singers’].

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Chapter
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Brahms in Context , pp. 130 - 137
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Christensen, T., ‘Four-Hand Piano Transcription and Geographies of Nineteenth-Century’, Journal of the American Musicological Society 52/2 (Summer 1999), 255–98CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drinker, S., Brahms and His Women’s Choruses (Merion, PA: Musurgia Publishers, 1952)Google Scholar
Hamilton, K. and Loges, N. (eds.), Brahms in the Home and the Concert Hall (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCorkle, M., ‘The Role of Trial Performances for Brahms’s Orchestral and Large Choral Works: Sources and Circumstances’, in Bozarth, G. (ed.), Brahms Studies: Historial and Analytical Perspectives (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998), 295328Google Scholar
Sumner Lott, M., The Social Worlds of Nineteenth-Century Chamber Music: Composers, Consumers, Communities (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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