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17 - Cognition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2021

Stephen Pihlaja
Affiliation:
Newman University
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Summary

Outlines the broad field of cognition, focusing on several key concepts driving research in the study of language in the mind: conceptual metaphor, metonymy, blending, and force-dynamics.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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