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Article contents

OPS vitrification of mouse immature oocytes before or after meiosis: the effect on cumulus cells maintenance and subsequent development

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2009

Lun Suo
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Guang-Bin Zhou
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Qing-Gang Meng
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Chang-Liang Yan
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Zhi-Qiang Fan
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Xue-Ming Zhao
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Xiang-Wei Fu
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Yan-Ping Wang
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Qing-Jing Zhang
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China.
Shi-En Zhu*
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, No. 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100093, P.R. China. Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, P.R. China. State Key Laboratories for Agrobiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100093, PR China.
*
All correspondence to: Shi-En Zhu. Laboratory of Animal Embryonic Biotechnology, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, No. 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100093, P.R. China. Tel:/Fax: +86 10 6273 1767. e-mail: zhushien@cau.edu.cn

Summary

Cryopreservation can cause cumulus cell damage around the immature oocytes, which may result in poor subsequent development. To evaluate the effect of the meiosis stage on the cumulus cell cryoinjury and determine the suitable stage for cryopreservation in immature oocytes, mouse oocytes at germinal vesicle (GV) and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) stages were vitrified using open pulled straw (OPS) method. Cumulus cells damage was scored immediately after thawing by double-fluorescent staining. The survival rate of the oocytes was evaluated and the subsequent development of oocytes was assessed through in vitro culture (IVC) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) separately. After vitrification, a higher proportion of cumulus cells of GV oocytes were damaged than those of GVBD and untreated control groups. The survival rate of vitrified GVBD oocytes (94.1%) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of GV oocytes (85.4%). Oocytes vitrified at GVBD stage (55.7%) showed similar cleavage rate compared to those at GV stage (49.2%), but significantly higher (p < 0.05) blastocyst rate (40.9% vs. 27.4%). These results demonstrate that oocytes at GVBD stage remain better cumulus membrane integrity and developmental ability during vitrification than those at GV stage, indicating they are more suitable for immature oocytes cryopreservation in mice.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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