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Effect of cigarette smoke condensate on mouse embryo development and expression of pluripotency and apoptotic genes in vitro

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 September 2022

Omid Banafshi
Affiliation:
Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Ebrahim Mohammadi
Affiliation:
Environmental Health Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran Department of Occupational Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Mohammad Abdi
Affiliation:
Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Ebrahim Ghaderi
Affiliation:
Zoonoses Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Science, Sanandaj, Iran
Vahideh Assadollahi
Affiliation:
Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Mohammad Bagher Khadem Erfan
Affiliation:
Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Mohammad Jafar Rezaei
Affiliation:
Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Fardin Fathi*
Affiliation:
Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
*
Author for correspondence: Fardin Fathi, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Pasdaran St, SanandajIran. Email: farfath@gmail.com

Summary

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on in vitro development of mouse embryos. In total 3000 NMRI mice 2PN embryos were divided into six groups (n = 500). The test group was exposed to 20, 40, 80, 160 or 320 μg/ml of CSC. In the control group, CSC was not added to the culture medium during the development of 2PN embryos. The effects of 20 and 80 μg/ml of CSC on genes involved in pluripotency and apoptosis, and also, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor gene was assessed in the blastocysts. Our results showed that CSC had an adverse effect on the viability of mouse embryos at the concentrations of 80, 160 and 320 μg/ml compared with the control group (P < 0.05). In contrast, it had positive effects on the viability of mouse embryos at the concentrations of 20 and 40 μg/ml compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The 20 and 80 μg/ml concentrations of CSC increased the expression of pluripotency, apoptotic, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor genes in the blastocyst embryo stage compared with the control group (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that concentrations higher than 40 μg/ml of CSC have an adverse effect on mouse embryo development in the preimplantation stages. Also, 20 and 80 μg/ml concentrations of CSC have a significant effect on the expression of pluripotency, apoptotic, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor genes in the blastocyst embryo stage compared with the control group.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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