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Differences in chimera formation and germline transmission between E14 and C2J embryonic stem cells in mice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2012

Yan Zhu
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Contraceptive Drugs and Devices of National Population and Family Planning Committee, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai 200032, China.
Dun-Gao Li
Affiliation:
Department of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, China. College of Wildlife Resource, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China.
Zhao-Gui Sun
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Contraceptive Drugs and Devices of National Population and Family Planning Committee, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, Shanghai 200032, China.
Xue-Jin Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, China.
Man-Xi Jiang
Affiliation:
Department of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, China Department of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, China.
Corresponding

Summary

The goal of this project was to determine whether the originating strain of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells affects the maintenance of their pluripotency under uniform culture conditions. ES cells from two strains of mice, E14 and C2J, were tested. Both ES cell lines were cultured in KOSR + 2i medium and then injected into C57BL/6J blastocysts. Our results demonstrate that this medium could support both E14 and C2J ES cells to keep their pluripotency, though E14 ES cells were found to have a higher chimeric rate than C2J ES cells. However, analysis by backcrossing revealed that C2J and E14 ES cells have the same ability for germline transmission. Our results demonstrate that ES cells derived from E14 and C2J cells have the same capacity for germline transmission when injected into C57BL/6J blastocysts; however, due to the limitation of mixed genetic background between E14 cells and host C57BL/6J embryos, C2J ES cells are preferable to E14 ES cells for use in gene-targeting and should become the cell line of choice for the generation of genetically engineered mutant mouse lines.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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References

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