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Tree Growth, Fruit Size, and Yield Response of Mature Peach to Weed-Free Intervals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Andrew W. MacRae
Affiliation:
Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
Wayne E. Mitchem
Affiliation:
Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
David W. Monks
Affiliation:
Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
Michael L. Parker
Affiliation:
Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
Roger K. Galloway
Affiliation:
Department of Horticultural Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

An experiment was conducted at one location in 1999 and two locations in 2000 to determine the critical weed-free period for peach in North Carolina. The cultivars for the three locations were ‘Contender’, ‘Norman’, and ‘Summerprince’. Weed-free intervals of 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 wk after peach tree bloom were established. Paraquat at 1.1 kg ai/ha plus nonionic surfactant at 0.25% v/v was applied every 10 d, after treatments were initiated at peach bloom, to maintain weed-free plots. Large crabgrass, hairy vetch, and smooth crabgrass were the primary weeds in Contender. Horseweed, smooth crabgrass, and large crabgrass were the primary weeds in Norman. Bermudagrass, smooth pigweed, and common lambsquarters were the primary weeds in Summerprince. No differences in trunk cross-sectional area were observed between the weed-free periods. Maintaining the orchard floor weed-free for 12 wk after peach tree bloom resulted in the greatest fruit size (individual fruit weight and diameter), total yield, and fruit number.

Type
Research
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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