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Sorption and Desorption of Imazethapyr and 5-Hydroxyimazethapyr in Minnesota Soils

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Jianying Gan
Affiliation:
Dep. Soil Sci.
Monte R. Weimer
Affiliation:
Dep. Agron. & Plant Genet, Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108
William C. Koskinen
Affiliation:
Soil & Water Manage
Douglas D. Buhler
Affiliation:
Plant Sci. Res. Unit, USDA-ARS, Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108
Donald L. Wyse
Affiliation:
Dep. Agron. & Plant Genet., Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108
Roger L. Becker
Affiliation:
Dep. Agron. & Plant Genet., Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108

Abstract

Laboratory batch equilibrium studies were conducted to evaluate the sorption-desorption behavior of imazethapyr and its major plant metabolite, 5-hydroxyimazethapyr, in three Minnesota soils. Sorption of both compounds on all soils was low, and pH did not significantly influence sorption in the range of 4,8 to 7.1. Less 5-hydroxyimazethapyr was sorbed than imazethapyr on the same soil. Once sorbed, both compounds were only partially desorbable from all soils. Significant hysteresis and formation of nonextractable residues indicate that the small amount of chemical sorbed is bound to selective surfaces with strong bonds. Webster clay loam had greater irreversibility than Waukegen silt loam and Estherville sandy loam soil. The hysteresis observed in desorption may be responsible for the difference between mobility estimations made from laboratory sorption studies and the limited mobility observed in field experiments.

Type
Soil, Air, and Water
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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Sorption and Desorption of Imazethapyr and 5-Hydroxyimazethapyr in Minnesota Soils
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