Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-ttgcf Total loading time: 2.222 Render date: 2021-04-12T08:03:11.829Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Persistence and Movement of Sethoxydim Residues in Three Minnesota Soils

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

William C. Koskinen
Affiliation:
Univ. Minnesota. St. Paul, MN 55108
Kathryn M. Reynolds
Affiliation:
Univ. Minnesota. St. Paul, MN 55108
Douglas D. Buhler
Affiliation:
Univ. Minnesota. St. Paul, MN 55108
Donald L. Wyse
Affiliation:
Univ. Minnesota. St. Paul, MN 55108
Brian L. Barber
Affiliation:
Univ. Minnesota. St. Paul, MN 55108
Leetta J. Jarvis
Affiliation:
Univ. Minnesota. St. Paul, MN 55108

Abstract

The persistence and movement of sethoxydim residues were determined in the top 45 cm of an Estherville sandy loam (sl), Port Byron silt loam (sil), and Webster clay loam (cl) in the field. Analysis of sethoxydim residues simultaneously quantified parent and eight metabolites by conversion to a common volatile end product, 3-[2(ethylsulfonyl)propyl]-pentanedioic acid dimethyl ester, followed by analysis using gas chromatography (GC) and a flame photometric detector. Recovery of residues from soil spiked with 100 μg kg-1 was 86 ± 21%. Residues remaining in soil 21 days after treatment (DAT) in 1989 were 37, 51, and 29% of the applied sethoxydim in the sl, sil, and cl, respectively, while in 1990, 86, 52, and 24% remained in the sl, sil, and cl, respectively. Alachlor remaining 21 DAT in 1989 was 66, 52, and 65% of that applied in the sl, sil, and cl, respectively, while in 1990, it was 16, 13, and 100% in the sl, sil, and cl, respectively. Atrazine had the greatest % of applied chemical remaining 21 DAT in 1989: 100, 71, and 73% in the sl, sil, and cl, respectively. of the atrazine applied in 1990, atrazine remaining 21 DAT was 87% in the sl, 42% in the sil, and 100% in the cl. Over all soils and years, the amount of total sethoxydim residues remaining 137 DAT was the least of the three herbicides. In terms of leaching, sethoxydim residues showed least movement, with minimal detections below 0 to 15 cm. Although sethoxydim appears to be advantageous over alachlor and atrazine in terms of potential impact on ground water quality, additional information regarding composition of the detected residues is needed to better assess its environmental impact.

Type
Soil, Air, and Water
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Adams, C. D. and Thurman, E. M. 1991. Formation and transport of deethylatrazine in soil and unsaturated zone. J. Environ. Qual. 20:540547.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Beestman, G. B. and Deming, J. M. 1974. Dissipation of acetanilide herbicides from soils. Agron. J. 66:308311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Buhler, D. D. and Burnside, O. C. 1984. Herbicidal activity of fluazifop-butyl, haloxyfop-methyl, and sethoxydim in soil. Weed Sci. 32:824831.Google Scholar
4. Campbell, J. R. and Penner, D. 1985. Abiotic transformations of sethoxydim. Weed Sci. 33:435439.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Cohen, S., Eiden, C., and Lorber, M. N. 1986. Monitoring groundwater for pesticides. Page 170197 in Garner, W. Y., Honeycutt, R. C., and Nigg, H. N. eds. Evaluation of pesticides in groundwater. ACS Symp. Ser. 315. Am. Chem. Soc., Washington, DC.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Dotray, P. A., Marshall, L. C., Parker, W. B., Wyse, D. L., Somers, D. A., and Gengenbach, B. G. 1993. Herbicide tolerance and weed control in sethoxydim-tolerant corn (Zea mays). Weed Sci. 41:213217.Google Scholar
7. Frank, R. and Sirons, G. J. 1985. Dissipation of atrazine residues from soils. Bull. Environ. Contain. Toxicol. 34:541548.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8. Gee, G. W. and Bauder, J. W. 1986. Particle size analysis. Page 383409 in Page, A. L., ed. Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 1. Physical and Mineral Methods. 2nd ed. Am. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI.Google Scholar
9. Ghardiri, H., Shea, P. J., Wicks, G. A., and Haderlie, L. C. 1984. Atrazine dissipation in conventional-till and no-till sorghum. J. Environ. Qual. 13:549552.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Helling, C. S., Zhuang, W., Gish, T. J., Coffman, C. B., Isensee, A. R., Kearney, P. C., Hoagland, D. R., and Woodwar, M. D. 1988. Persistence and leaching of atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine under no-tillage practices. Chemosphere 17:175187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Hsiao, A. I. and Smith, A. E. 1983. A root bioassay procedure for the determination of chlorsulfuron, diclofop acid, and sethoxydim residues in soil. Weed Res. 23:231236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Huang, L. Q. and Frink, C. R. 1989. Distribution of atrazine, simazine, alachlor, and metolachlor in soil profiles in Connecticut. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 43:159164.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13. Isensee, A. R., Helling, C. S., Gish, T. J., Kearney, P. C., Coffman, C. B., and Zhuang, W. 1988. Groundwater residues of atrazine, alachlor, and cyanazine under no-tillage practices. Chemosphere 17:165174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Klaseus, T. G., Buzicky, G. C., and Schneider, E. C. 1988. Pesticides and Groundwater: Surveys of Selected Minnesota Wells. Minnesota Dep. Agric., St. Paul, MN. 95 pp.Google Scholar
15. Koskinen, W. C., Jarvis, L. J., Dowdy, R. H., Wyse, D. L., and Buhler, D. D. 1991. Automation of atrazine and alachlor extraction from soil using a laboratory robotic system. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 55:561562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Nelson, D. W. and Sommers, L. E. 1982. Total carbon, organic carbon, and organic matter. Pages 539579 in Page, A. L., ed. Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 2. Chemical and Microbiological Properties. 2nd ed. Am. Soc. Agron., Madison, WI.Google Scholar
17. Parker, W. B. 1990. Selection and characterization of sethoxydim- and haloxyfop-tolerant corn (Zea mays). Ph.D. Thesis, Univ. Minnesota. 88 pp.Google Scholar
18. Pereira, W. E. and Rostad, C. E. 1990. Occurrence, distribution and transport of herbicides and their degradation products in the lower Mississippi River and its tributaries. Environ. Sci. Technol. 24:14001406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Smith, A. E. and Hsiao, A. I. 1983. Persistence studies with the herbicide sethoxydim in prairie soils. Weed Res. 23:253258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20. Sorenson, B. A., Wyse, D. L., Koskinen, W. C., Buhler, D. D., Lueschen, W. E., and Jorgenson, M. D. 1993. Formation and movement of 14C-atrazine degradation products in a sandy loam soil under field conditions. Weed Sci. 41:239245.Google Scholar
21. Walker, A. and Brown, P. A. 1985. The relative persistence in soil of five acetanilide herbicides. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 34:143149.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
22. Weed Science Society of America. 1989. Pages 232233 in Herbicide Handbook. 6th ed. Weed Sci. Soc. Am., Champaign, EL.Google Scholar
23. Wu, T. L. 1980. Dissipation of the herbicides atrazine and alachlor in a Maryland corn field. J. Environ. Qual. 9:459465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 12th June 2017 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Persistence and Movement of Sethoxydim Residues in Three Minnesota Soils
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Persistence and Movement of Sethoxydim Residues in Three Minnesota Soils
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Persistence and Movement of Sethoxydim Residues in Three Minnesota Soils
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *