Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Article contents

Garden huckleberry (Solanum melanocerasium) germination, seed survival, and response to herbicides

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Bo Tao
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Protection, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China 150030
Edward L. Deckard
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105
Calvin G. Messersmith
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Garden huckleberry, a member of the Solanaceae family and a close relative of black nightshade, is an exotic plant introduced from Africa. Information on garden huckleberry response to a new environment and to herbicides is useful for determining the potential of this species to become an invasive weed, predicting the potential range of this species in the United States, and developing an optimum garden huckleberry management program. Germination and survival of garden huckleberry seed, as affected by environmental factors, were studied under greenhouse and controlled-environment growth chamber conditions. Garden huckleberry seed became viable between 2 and 3 wk after anthesis and was nondormant when separated from fresh berries. Garden huckleberry seed was not photoblastic and germinated equally well under both a 14-h photoperiod and continuous darkness. Seed germinated at constant temperatures from 17 to 35 C, with optimum germination between 22 and 30 C. Germination of garden huckleberry seed markedly declined as the osmotic potential of the germination medium decreased. The optimum pH for germination of garden huckleberry was between 5 and 9. Paraquat, dicamba, and bromoxynil provided excellent garden huckleberry control (95 to 100%); atrazine and glyphosate were more phytotoxic (90%) than imazamox (80%); and acifluorfen and foramsulfuron gave inadequate control.

Type
Weed Biology and Ecology
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Arnold, S. J. 1985. Eastern black nightshade—an increasing concern for soybean and forage producers. Crops Soils Mag 37/9:2931.Google Scholar
Axton, L. M. and Durgan, B. R. 1991. Plants poisonous to livestock. St. Paul, MN: Minn. Ext. Serv. Bull. AG-FO-5655.Google Scholar
Bithell, S. L., McKenzie, B. A., Bourdot, G. W., Hill, G. D., and Wratten, S. D. 2002. Germination requirements of laboratory stored seeds of black nightshade and hairy nightshade. Pages 222227 in Proceedings of the 55th Conference of the New Zealand Plant Protection. Rotorua, New Zealand: New Zealand Plant Protection Society, Inc.Google Scholar
Chachalis, D. and Reddy, K. N. 2000. Factors affecting Campsis radicans seed germination and seedling emergence. Weed Sci 48:212216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crotser, M. P. and Witt, W. W. 2000. Effect of Glycine max canopy characteristics, G. max interference, and weed-free period on Solanum ptycanthum growth. Weed Sci 48:2026.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DeFelice, M. S. 2003. The black nightshades, Solanum nigrum L. et al.— poison, poultice, and pie. Weed Technol 17:421427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Focho, D. A., Fontem, D. A., Berinyuy, J. E., and Schippers, R. R. 2002. Morphological diversity of Solanum scabrum accessions in Cameroon. IPGRI Plant Genet. Resour. Newsl 131:4248.Google Scholar
[ISTA] International Seed Testing Association. 1985. International rules for seed testing. Seed Sci. Technol 13:307513.Google Scholar
Koger, C. H., Reddy, K. N., and Poston, D. H. 2004. Factors affecting seed germination, seedling emergence, and survival of texasweed (Caperonia palustris). Weed Sci 52:989995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Michel, B. E. 1983. Evaluation of the water potentials of solutions of polyethylene glycol 8000 both in the absence and presence of other solutes. Plant Physiol 72:6670.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ogg, A. G. Jr. and Dawson, J. H. 1984. Time of emergence of eight weed species. Weed Sci 32:327335.Google Scholar
Ogg, A. G. Jr. and Rogers, B. S. 1989. Taxonomy, distribution, biology, and control of black nightshade and related species in the United States and Canada. Rev. Weed Sci 4:2558.Google Scholar
Reddy, K. N. and Singh, M. 1992. Germination and emergence of hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa). Weed Sci 40:195199.Google Scholar
Roberts, H. A. and Lockett, P. M. 1978. Seed dormancy and field emergence in Solanum nigrum L. Weed Res 18:231241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stephens, J. M. 1994. Huckleberry, garden—Solanum melanocerasium All. Fact sheet HS-613 of the series of horticultural science. Gainesville, FL: Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, University of Florida.Google Scholar
Thomson, C. E. and Witt, W. W. 1987. Germination of cutleaf groundcherry (Physalis angulata), smooth groundcherry (Physalis virginiana), and eastern black nightshade (Solanum ptycanthum). Weed Sci 35:5862.Google Scholar
Thullen, R. J. and Keeley, P. E. 1982. The effects of some environmental conditions on the germination of black nightshade and ivyleaf morningglory. Proc. West. Soc. Weed Sci 35:7682.Google Scholar
[USDA] U.S. Department of Agriculture Salinity Laboratory. 1954. Diagnosis and Improvement of Saline and Alkali Soils. Agriculture Handbook 60, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
Westbrooks, R. D. 1991. Plant protection issues, I: a commentary on new weeds in the United States. Weed Technol 5:232237.Google Scholar
Zhou, J., Deckard, E. L., and Ahrens, W. H. 2005. Factors affecting germination of hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides) seeds. Weed Sci 53:4145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 8 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th January 2017 - 24th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-fv2z2 Total loading time: 0.361 Render date: 2021-01-24T09:17:53.908Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Garden huckleberry (Solanum melanocerasium) germination, seed survival, and response to herbicides
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Garden huckleberry (Solanum melanocerasium) germination, seed survival, and response to herbicides
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Garden huckleberry (Solanum melanocerasium) germination, seed survival, and response to herbicides
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *