Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-bmnx5 Total loading time: 0.278 Render date: 2021-04-19T01:15:35.743Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Fate of MBR-18337 in Soybean (Glycine max) and Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) Plants and Cell Cultures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

Beth A. Swisher
Affiliation:
Dep. Crop Sci., North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27650
Frederick T. Corbin
Affiliation:
Dep. Crop Sci., North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27650

Abstract

Uptake, translocation, and metabolism of 14C-MBR-18337 {[N-[(4-ethylthio)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] methanesulfonamide]} in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and johnsongrass [Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.] plants and cell cultures were studied. Sixty-five percent of the 14C recovered from soybean (65% of applied) was on or in the treated leaf, compared to 81% of the 14C recovered from johnsongrass (43% of applied). Translocation of the 14C from the treated leaf of soybean was greater than from the treated johnsongrass leaf, and was primarily to the apical leaves of both species. MBR-18337, its sulfoxide, sulfone, and an unidentified polar component(s) were isolated from intact plants and cell cultures of both species. Soybean plants and cells contained greater proportions of the polar component(s) than johnsongrass plants and cells.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 Weed Science Society of America 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Carringer, R. D., Rieck, C. E., and Bush, L. P. 1978. Metabolism of EPTC in corn. Weed Sci. 26:157160.Google Scholar
2. Casida, J. E., Kimmel, E. C., Ohkawa, H., Rodebush, J. E., Gray, R. A., Tseng, C. K., and Tilles, T. H. 1975. Thiocarbamate sulfoxide herbicides. Environ. Qual. Saf., Suppl. 3:675679.Google ScholarPubMed
3. Fehr, W. R., Caviness, C. E., Burwood, D. T., and Pennington, J. S. 1971. Stage of development descriptions for soybeans. Crop Sci. 11:929931.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Gamborg, O. D., Miller, R. A., and Ojima, K. 1968. Nutrient requirements of suspension cultures of soybean root cells. Exp. Cell Res. 50:151158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5. Hatzios, K. K. and Penner, D. 1982. Metabolism of Herbicides in Higher Plants. Burgess Pub., Minneapolis, MN. 142.Google Scholar
6. Helms, R. L., Blackmon, W. J., and Reynolds, B. D. 1980. Comparisons of BAS-9052, KK-80, and MBR-18337 for the control of johnsongrass and annual grasses in cotton. Proc. South. Weed Sci. Soc. 33:55.Google Scholar
7. Martin, J. T. and Juniper, B. E. 1970. The Cuticles of Plants. St. Martins Press, New York. 347.Google Scholar
8. Metcalf, R. L., Fukuto, T. R., Collins, C., Borck, K., Burk, J., Reynolds, H. T., and Osman, M. F. 1966. Metabolism of 2-methyl-2-(methylthio)-propionaldehyde-o-(methylcarbamoyl)oxime in plant and insect. J. Agric. Food Chem. 14:579584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 12th June 2017 - 19th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Fate of MBR-18337 in Soybean (Glycine max) and Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) Plants and Cell Cultures
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Fate of MBR-18337 in Soybean (Glycine max) and Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) Plants and Cell Cultures
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Fate of MBR-18337 in Soybean (Glycine max) and Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) Plants and Cell Cultures
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *