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Effects of Rotational Crop Herbicides on Rice (Oryza sativa)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

David H. Johnson
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Fayetteville, AR 72701
J. Dwayne Beaty
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Southeast Res. and Ext. Center, Monticello, AR 71656
Diana K. Horton
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Fayetteville, AR 72701
Ronald E. Talbert
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Fayetteville, AR 72701
Charles B. Guy
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Monticello, AR 71656
John D. Mattice
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Fayetteville, AR 72701
Terry L. Lavy
Affiliation:
Univ. Arkansas, Dep. Agron., Fayetteville, AR 72701
Roy J. Smith
Affiliation:
U.S. Dep. Agric. Res. Serv., Stuttgart, AR 72160

Abstract

Experiments were conducted from 1989 to 1991 on two silt loam and two clay soils to determine the effect of herbicides applied to the previous crop on growth and yield of rice. All herbicides were applied preplant-incorporated at recommended rates adjusted as needed for soil texture. Rice was planted the following year. Imazaquin, imazethapyr, alachlor, metolachlor, clomazone, trifluralin, and atrazine did not injure rice the year following application. Norflurazon was the only herbicide to injure rice on silt loam soils, with injury at one silt loam location in one of two years. Norflurazon and fluometuron residues caused rice injury on clay soils, and chlorimuron residues caused injury in one year on a day soil. This chlorimuron carryover injury was from August-planted soybean but did not occur from June-planted soybean. Norflurazon, fluometuron, and chlorimuron temporarily reduced rice dry matter early in the season. No herbicide reduced either rough rice or percent head rice yield on any of the soils.

Type
Weed Management
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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