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Effect of pH, Nitrogen, and Tillage on Weed Control and Corn (Zea mays) Yield

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

J. J. Kells
Affiliation:
Agron. Dep., Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546
R. L. Blevins
Affiliation:
Agron. Dep., Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546
C. E. Rieck
Affiliation:
Agron. Dep., Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546
W. M. Muir
Affiliation:
Exp. Stn. Statistician, Coll. Agric., Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Abstract

Field studies were conducted to determine the effect of soil surface (upper 5 cm) pH and tillage on weed control and corn (Zea mays L.) yield using simazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis-(ethylamino)-s-triazine] as the herbicide for weed control. Soil pH, weed control, and corn yield were examined under no-tillage and conventional tillage systems with and without added lime and different rates of nitrogen. Increased soil pH significantly increased weed control as compared with added lime vs. no added lime, where the surface soil pH influenced the effectiveness of the applied simazine. Soil pH had a greater effect on weed control under no-tillage than under conventional tillage. Conventional tillage significantly (P<.01) increased weed control, yield, and soil pH over no-tillage. Additions of lime as compared to unlimed treatments resulted in significantly increased weed control (83% vs. 63%), yield (5,930 vs. 5,290 kg/ha) and soil pH (5.91 vs. 5.22). The poorest weed control was observed with no-tillage on unlimed plots. A significant tillage by linear effect of nitrogen interaction for all variables resulted from a greater decrease (P<.01) in weed control and soil pH and a greater increase in yield with increased nitrogen under no-tillage than with conventional tillage.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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