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Arthropods Exported from California to the U.S.S.R. for Ragweed Control

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

R. D. Goeden
Affiliation:
Div. of Biol. Contr., Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92502
O. V. Kovalev
Affiliation:
All-Union Plant Protection Institute, Leningrad, 190000, U.S.S.R.
D. W. Ricker
Affiliation:
Div. of Biol. Contr., Univ. of California, Riverside, CA 92502

Abstract

The following species of arthropods were exported from California to the U.S.S.R. for the biological control of ragweed (Ambrosia spp.): Tarachidia candefacta Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae); Coleophora sp. near annulatella Braun (Lepidoptera: Coleophoridae); and Eriophyes boycei Keifer (Acarina: Eriophyidae). Tarachidia candefacta represents the first insect species intentionally introduced from North America into Europe and established for biological weed control.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 by the Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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