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A new technique for estimating chromatic isoluminance in humans and monkeys

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 June 2009

Avi Chaudhuri
Affiliation:
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA
Thomas D. Albright
Affiliation:
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA

Abstract

Current approaches to the problem of equating different colors for luminance (chromatic isoluminance) rely upon human reports of perceptual events that are reduced at some luminance ratio. In this report, a technique is described that evokes a vivid percept of motion of a textured pattern only at isoluminance. Furthermore, in both humans and monkeys, the moving stimulus produces a striking optokinetic response in the same direction as the perceived motion. If used in this manner, the technique can provide an estimate of chromatic isoluminance in a variety of species and be used to corroborate a human subjects's perceptual judgement.

Type
Short Communication
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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