Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Dorothea or Jane? The Dilemmas of Early Feminist Criticism

  • Martha Vicinus
Extract

I have never forgotten a comment made by a friend at the first feminist meeting, held in Bloomington Indiana, in the spring of 1969: “Nothing travels faster than an idea whose time has come.” We were amazed and thrilled to discover how much we had in common with other women, and how the women's movement in its early stages gave us permission to express in public a variety of extreme emotions. All of us at that meeting were young, untenured faculty and graduate students, and suddenly—or at least so it seemed—we could speak out against authority. And sometimes authority listened. We quickly turned to writing, our natural medium, for we realized that our academic work had an immediate resonance with our political ambitions. How rare and special this moment was for those of us who worked on the literature of dead authors!

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Dorothea or Jane? The Dilemmas of Early Feminist Criticism
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Dorothea or Jane? The Dilemmas of Early Feminist Criticism
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Dorothea or Jane? The Dilemmas of Early Feminist Criticism
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
Brontë, Charlotte. Jane Eyre (1847). Edited by Smith, Margaret. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.
Eliot, George. Middlemarch (1871). Edited by Carroll, David. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.
Millett, Kate. Sexual Politics. New York: Doubleday, 1970.
Colby, Vineta. A Singular Anomaly: Women Novelists of the Nineteenth Century. New York: New York University Press, 1970.
Vicinus, Martha, ed. Suffer and Be Still: Women in the Victorian Age. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1972. Includes Kate Millett, “The Debate over Women: Ruskin vs. Mill” and Jane Stedman, “From Dame to Women: W. S. Gilbert and Theatrical Transvestism.”
Rich, Adrienne. “The Temptations of a Motherless Woman.” In On Lies, Secrets, and Silence: Selected Prose, 1966–1978. New York: Norton, 1979. Originally given as a talk in 1972; published in Ms. in 1973.
Beer, Patricia. Reader, I Married Him: A Study of the Women Characters of Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1974.
Showalter, Elaine. “Dinah Mulock Craik and the Tactics of Sentiment: A Case Study of Victorian Female Authorship.” Feminist Studies 2 (1975): 523.
Peters, Margot. Unquiet Soul: A Biography of Charlotte Brontë. New York: Doubleday, 1975.
Redinger, Ruby. George Eliot: The Emergent Self. New York: Knopf, 1975.
Spacks, Patricia Meyer. The Female Imagination. New York: Knopf, 1975.
Kaplan, Cora, ed. Salt and Bitter and Good: Three Centuries of English and American Women Poets. New York: Paddington, 1975.
Auerbach, Nina. “The Power of Hunger: Demonism and Maggie Tulliver.” Nineteenth-Century Fiction 30 (September 1975): 150–71.
Gubar, Susan. “The Genesis of Hunger, According to Shirley.” Feminist Studies 3 (Summer 1976): 521.
Moers, Ellen. Literary Women. New York: Doubleday, 1976.
Showalter, Elaine. A Literature of Their Own: British Women Novelists from Brontë to Lessing. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1977.
Gilbert, Sandra. “Plain Jane's Progress.” Signs 2 (Summer 1977): 779804.
Mitchell, Sally. “Sentiment and Suffering: Women's Recreational Reading in the 1860s.” Victorian Studies 21 (Fall 1977): 2945.
Vicinus, Martha, ed. A Widening Sphere: Changing Roles of Victorian Women. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1977. Includes Sally Mitchell, “The Forgotten Women of the Period: Penny Weekly Family Magazines of the 1840s and 1850s.”
Jacobus, Mary, ed. Women Writing and Writing about Women. New York: Barnes & Noble, 1979. Includes her “The Buried Letter: Feminism and Romanticism in Villette,” Cora Kaplan's “The Indefinite Disclosed: Christina Rossetti and Emily Dickinson,” and Gillian Beer's “Beyond Determinism: George Eliot and Virginia Woolf.”
Gilbert, Sandra M. and Gubar, Susan. The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979.
Homans, Margaret. Women Writers and Poetic Identity: Dorothy Wordsworth, Emily Brontë, and Emily Dickinson. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980.
Mitchell, Sally. The Fallen Angel: Chastity, Class, and Women's Reading, 1835–1880. Bowling Green, OH: Bowling Green University Popular Press, 1981.
Vicinus, Martha. “‘Helpless and Unfriended’: Nineteenth-Century Domestic Melodrama.” New Literary History 13 (Fall 1981): 127–43.
Auerbach, Nina. Women and the Demon: The Life of a Victorian Myth. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1982.
Spivak, Gayatri. “Three Women's Texts and a Critique of Imperialism.” Critical Inquiry, 12 no. 1 (Autumn 1985): 243–61.
Gallagher, Catherine. The Industrial Reformation of English Fiction: Social Discourse and Narrative Form, 1832–1867. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985.
Armstrong, Nancy. Desire and Domestic Fictions: A Political History of the Novel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Victorian Literature and Culture
  • ISSN: 1060-1503
  • EISSN: 1470-1553
  • URL: /core/journals/victorian-literature-and-culture
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed