Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Twin-Singleton Differences in Neonatal Brain Structure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2012

Rebecca C. Knickmeyer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America. rebecca_knickmeyer@med.unc.edu
Chaeryon Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
Sandra Woolson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
J. Keith Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
Robert M. Hamer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America; Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
Weili Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
Guido Gerig
Affiliation:
Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, United States of America.
Martin Styner
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America; Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
John H. Gilmore
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, United States of America.
Corresponding

Abstract

Twin studies suggest that global and regional brain volumes are highly heritable. However, estimates of heritability vary across development. Given that all twin studies are open to the potential criticism of non-generalizability due to differences in intrauterine environment between twins and singletons, these age effects may reflect the influence of perinatal environmental factors, which are unique to twins and which may be especially evident early in life. To address this question, we compared brain volumes and the relationship of brain volumes to gestational age in 136 singletons (67 male, 69 female) and 154 twins (75 male, 79 female; 82 DZ, 72 MZ) who had received high resolution MRI scans of the brain in the first month of life. Intracranial volume, total white matter, and ventricle volumes did not differ between twins and singletons. However, cerebrospinal fluid and frontal white matter volume was greater in twins compared to singletons. While gray matter volumes at MRI did not differ between groups, the slope of the relationship between total and cortical gray matter and gestational age at the MRI scan was steeper in MZ twins compared to DZ twins. Post-hoc analyses suggested that gray matter development is delayed in MZ twins in utero and that they experience ‘catch-up’ growth in the first month of life. These differences should be taken into account when interpreting and designing studies in the early postnatal period.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 2
Total number of PDF views: 116 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 17th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-vchrx Total loading time: 0.269 Render date: 2021-01-17T08:58:07.007Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sun Jan 17 2021 08:54:14 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Twin-Singleton Differences in Neonatal Brain Structure
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Twin-Singleton Differences in Neonatal Brain Structure
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Twin-Singleton Differences in Neonatal Brain Structure
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *