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Thalamocortical dysrhythmia I. Functional and imaging aspects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 April 2006

R. Llinás
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue MSB-442, New York, NY 10016, USA
U. Ribary
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue MSB-442, New York, NY 10016, USA
D. Jeanmonod
Affiliation:
Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitatsspital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
R. Cancro
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
E. Kronberg
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue MSB-442, New York, NY 10016, USA
J. Schulman
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue MSB-442, New York, NY 10016, USA
M. Zonenshayn
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue MSB-442, New York, NY 10016, USA
M. Magnin
Affiliation:
Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitatsspital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
A. Morel
Affiliation:
Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitatsspital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
M. Siegmund
Affiliation:
Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitatsspital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

Thalamic and cortical neurons are richly and reciprocally interconnected and support recurrent functional loops in the intact brain, but the role of this circuitry is still poorly understood. Here, we present evidence—from cellular and from functional neuroimaging in control and clinical domains—that thalamocortical resonance is not only a prerequisite for normal cognition, but that its perturbation, in a dynamic sense (e.g. a dysrhythmia) can underlie a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2001 Elsevier Science Ltd

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