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Limitations and Future of Reticon Detectors

  • Gordon A. H. Walker (a1)

Abstract

Linear arrays of self-scanned silicon diodes have been used in astronomical spectroscopy for over a decade. With care in the flat-fielding and data reduction they can be calibrated to better than 0.1%. They are still the best detector for signal to noise levels >100 when continuous wide-band coverage is needed. CCD's should be capable of this spectrophotometric performance but, for the forseeable future, the lack of a large format and their high cost only make them competitive for spectroscopy of single spectral features or multiple echelle spectra.

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References

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