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Social Policy and Human Rights: Re-thinking the Engagement

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2008

Hartley Dean*
Affiliation:
Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science E-mail: h.dean@lse.ac.uk

Abstract

It is argued that the encompassing concept of welfare rights that is contained within the Social Policy literature – and which has developed from TH Marshall's distinction between civil and political rights on the one hand and social or welfare rights on the other – provides a clearer and more explicit basis for an international call for the progressive development of social policies than, for example, the human rights approach to poverty reduction currently espoused by the UNDP and OHCHR. Social rights continue to be a relatively marginalised or qualified element of the human rights agenda and may be more effectively harnessed by way of a welfare rights approach based on a politics of needs interpretation.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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