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Turnover prevention of a mobile robot on uneven terrain using the concept of stability space

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 August 2008

Jeong-Hee Lee*
Affiliation:
School of Electrical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
Jae-Byung Park
Affiliation:
Division of Electronics and Information Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea.
Beom-Hee Lee
Affiliation:
School of Electrical Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: meeckee2@snu.ac.kr

Summary

Mobile robots in field environment travel not only on even terrain but also on uneven or sloped terrain. Practical methods for preventing turnover of the mobile robot are essential since the turnover of the mobile robot is very perilous. This paper proposes an efficient algorithm for preventing turnover of a mobile robot on uneven terrain by controlling linear acceleration and rotational velocity of the mobile robot. The concept of the modified zero moment point (ZMP) is proposed for evaluating the potential turnover of the mobile robot. Also, the turnover stability indices for linear acceleration and rotational velocity are defined with the modified ZMP. The turnover stability space (TSS) with turnover stability indices is presented to control the mobile robot in order to avoid turnover effectively. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are verified through simulations conducted on a three-wheeled mobile robot.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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