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Commodity Demands and Female Labour-Supply over the Life-Cycle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2016


Pedro Duarte Neves
Affiliation:
Universidade Católica Portuguesa

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Summary

This paper outlines a methodology to identify the preference parameters that characterize household behaviour over the life-cycle, through the specification and estimation of a model of individual behaviour. The focus of this research is directed towards commodity demands, female labour supply and the intertemporal allocation of lifetime wealth. Empirical estimates of the parameters of interest are reported at the end of this paper.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de recherches économiques et sociales 1992

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