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Buried Ancient Forest and Implications for Paleoclimate Since the Mid-Holocene in South China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

C D Shen
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Isotope Geochronology and Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China State Key Laboratory of Nuclear physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
P Ding
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Isotope Geochronology and Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
N Wang
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Isotope Geochronology and Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
W X Yi
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Isotope Geochronology and Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
X F Ding
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Nuclear physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
D P Fu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Nuclear physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
K X Liu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Nuclear physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
L P Zhou
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

The historical evolution of an ancient forest that developed at Gaoyao, south China, can be divided into 4 stages of radiocarbon intervals (1.1–1.5, 2.0–3.5, 3.6–4.0, and 4.3–4.9 ka) in which the last 3 stages all developed in a wetland and formed humic layers of 2.0, 0.5, and 0.7 m depth, respectively. The humic layers were interrupted by 2 white-gray silty clay layers that most likely formed during climate fluctuations. Four drought events were identified during the evolution of the ancient forest, occurring around 4.3, 3.6, 2.0, and 1.1 ka, respectively, with durations of ∼1000 14C yr. These events are consistent with other records both in low- and high-latitude areas, in particular with the little ice ages occurring since the mid-Holocene. Precipitation likely increased from 5.0 to 3.6 ka in south China, then decreased, which is probably the main cause for the development as well as the demise of the ancient forest.

Type
Soils and Sediments
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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