Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Galaxy Metabolism

  • Andrew Hopkins (a1)

Extract

‘Galaxy Metabolism' was the second in the annual ‘Southern Cross Astrophysics Conference Series’ (http://www.aao.gov.au/AAO/southerncross/), supported by the Anglo-Australian Observatory and the Australia Telescope National Facility. It was held at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Darling Harbour, Sydney, from 22 to 26 June 2009, and was attended by 91 delegates from around the world.

Over the past decade, both the star formation history and stellar mass density in galaxies spanning most of cosmic history have been well constrained. This provides the backdrop and framework within which many detailed investigations of galaxy growth are now placed. The mass-dependent and environment-dependent evolution of galaxies over cosmic history is now the focus of several surveys. Many studies are also exploring the role of gas infall and outflow in driving galaxy evolution, and the connection of these processes to massive star formation within galaxies.

The aims of ‘Galaxy Metabolism’ were to bring together the global constraints on galaxy evolution, at both low and high redshift, with detailed studies of well-resolved systems, to define a clear picture of our understanding of galaxy metabolism: How do the processes of ingestion (infall), digestion (ISM physics, star formation) and excretion (outflow) govern the global properties of galaxies; how do these change over a galaxy's lifetime; and are the constraints from nearby well resolved studies consistent with those from large population surveys at low and high redshift?

The conference was a great success, with an extensive variety of topics covered spanning many aspects of galaxy evolution, and brought together eloquently in a comprehensive conference summary by Warrick Couch. The four papers by De Lucia (2010), Cole (2010), Vlajić (2010) and Stocke et al. (2010) presented in this special collection of PASA are just a sampling of the depth and variety of the resentations given during the conference.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Galaxy Metabolism
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Galaxy Metabolism
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Galaxy Metabolism
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Cole, A., 2010, PASA, 27, 234
De Lucia, G., 2010, PASA, 27, 242
Stocke, J. T., Keeney, B. A. & Danforth, C. W., 2010, PASA, 27, 256
Vlajić, M., 2010, PASA, 27, 252

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed