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        The nutritional content of supermarket beverages: a cross-sectional analysis of New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK – CORRIGENDUM
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        The nutritional content of supermarket beverages: a cross-sectional analysis of New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK – CORRIGENDUM
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        The nutritional content of supermarket beverages: a cross-sectional analysis of New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK – CORRIGENDUM
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First published online – 7 February 2018, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980017004128

Original text (page 1, Abstract):

NZ had the highest percentage of beverages with sugar added to them (52 %), while the UK had the lowest (9 %, P<0·001).

Original text (page 4, Results):

Volumetric nutritional content

Overall, NZ had the largest proportion of supermarket beverages that contained added sugar (52·3 %). This was significantly higher than Australia (42·2 %), Canada (42·8 %) and the UK (9·0%; P≤0·001).

Original text (page 2):

For each product, the following data were recorded from the product nutrition labels: brand name, product name, energy (kJ), protein, fat, carbohydrate and sugar content (g/100ml), ingredients list, manufacturer-declared serving size and number of servings per pack.

Original text (page 3):

Taxation categories were <5g/sugar/100ml (no tax), 5–8 sugar/100ml (18% tax per litre) and >8g sugar/100ml (24% tax per litre).

Original text (page 6, Figure 1 caption):

The UK sugar-tax levy proposes three categories: , <5g sugar/100ml (no tax); , 5–8g sugar/100ml (18% tax per litre); , >8g sugar/100ml (24% tax per litre).

Correction:

NZ had the highest percentage of beverages with sugar added to them (52 %), while the UK had the lowest (39 %, P<0·001).

Correction:

Volumetric nutritional content

Overall, NZ had the largest proportion of supermarket beverages that contained added sugar (52·3 %). This was significantly higher than Australia (42·2 %), Canada (42·8 %) and the UK (38·8 %; P≤0·001).

Correction:

For each product, the following data were recorded from the product labels: brand name, product name, energy (kJ), protein, fat, carbohydrate and sugar content (g/100ml), ingredients list, manufacturer-declared serving size and number of servings per pack.

Correction:

Taxation categories were <5g/sugar/100ml (no tax), 5–8 sugar/100ml (18 pence (p) per litre) and >8g sugar/100ml (24p per litre).

Correction:

The UK sugar-tax levy proposes three categories: , <5g sugar/100ml (no tax); , 5–8g sugar/100ml (18p per litre); , >8g sugar/100ml (24p per litre).