Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

What do the neurosciences tell us about anxiety disorders? A comment1

  • Isaac Marks and Adolf Tobeña
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      What do the neurosciences tell us about anxiety disorders? A comment1
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      What do the neurosciences tell us about anxiety disorders? A comment1
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      What do the neurosciences tell us about anxiety disorders? A comment1
      Available formats
      ×

Abstract

  • An abstract is not available for this content so a preview has been provided below. To view the full text please use the links above to select your preferred format.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Bolles, R. C. & Fanselow, M. S. (1980). A perceptual–defensive–recuperative model of fear and pain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3, 291323.
Charney, D., Menkes, D. B. & Henninger, G. R. (1981). Receptor sensitivity and the mechanisms of action of antidepressant treatment: implications for the etiology and therapy of depression. Archives of General Psychiatry 38, 11601180.
Charney, D., Henninger, G. R. & Breier, A. (1984). Noradrenergic function in panic anxiety: effects of yohimbine in healthy subjects and patients with agoraphobia and panic disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry 41, 751763.
Driscoll, P. & Battig, K. (1982). Behavioral, emotional and neurochemical profiles of rats selected for extreme differences in active, two way avoidance, performances. In Genetics of the Brain (ed. Lieblich, I.), pp. 95123. Elsevier: Amsterdam.
Gallup, G. G. & Maser, J. D. (1977). Tonic immobility. In Psychopathology: Experimental Models (ed. Maser, J. and Seligman, M.), pp. 334357. W. H. Freeman: San Francisco.
Graeff, G. G. (1981). Minor tranquilizers and brain defense systems. Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Biological Research 14, 239265.
Gray, J. A. (1982). The Neuropsychology of Anxiety: an Enqiry into the Functions of the Septohippocampal System. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
Haefely, W. (1983). The biological basis of benzodiazepine action. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 132.
Iversen, S. D. (1985). Where in the central nervous system do benzodiazepines act? In Psychopharmacology – Progress and Future Prospects (ed. Iversen, S. D.), pp. 7588. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
Kandel, E. R. (1983). From metapsychology to molecular biology: explorations into the nature of anxiety. American Journal of Psychiatry 140, 12771293.
Kandel, E. R. (1984). Steps toward a molecular grammar for learning: explorations into the nature of memory. Harvard/Bicentennial Symposium.
Marks, I. M. (1983). Are there anticompulsive or antiphobic drugs? Review of the evidence. British Journal of Psychiatry 143, 338347.
Marks, I. M. (1986). Fears, Phobias and Rituals. Oxford University Press: New York (in the press).
Mineka, S. (1985). Animal models of anxiety based disorders. In Anxiety and the Anxiety Disorders (ed. Maser, J. and Tuma, H.). Lawrence Erlbaum: Hillsdale, NJ.
Post, R. M., Pickar, D., Ballenger, J. C. M., Naber, D. & Rubinow, D. R. (1984). Endogenous opiates in cerebro-spinal fluid: relationship to mood and anxiety. In Neurobiology of Mood Disorders (ed. Post, R. M. and Ballenger, J. C.), pp. 356368. Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore.
Redmond, D. E. & Huang, Y. H. (1979). New evidence for a locus coeruleus norepinephrine connection with anxiety. Life Sciences 25, 21492162.
Reinhardt, J. F., Bannon, M. J. & Roth, R. H. (1982). Acceleration by stress of dopamine synthesis and metabolism in prefrontal cortex: antagonism by diazepam. Archives of Pharmacology (new series) 318, 374377.
Sepinwall, J. (1983). Behavioural studies related to the neurochemical mechanisms of action of anxiolytics. In Anxiolytics: Neurochemical, Behavioral and Clinical Perspectives (ed. Malick, J. B.Enna, S. J. and Yamamura, H. I.). Raven Press: New York.
Snyder, S. H. & Peroutka, S. J. (1984). Antidepressants and neurotransmitter receptors. In Neurobiology of Mood Disorders (ed. Post, R. M. and Ballenger, J. C.), pp. 686697. Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore.
Stone, E. A. (1983). Problems with current catecholamine hypothesis of antidepressant agents: speculations leading to a new hypothesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6, 535577.
Taylor, D. P., Riblet, L. A. & Stanton, H. C. (1983). Dopamine and anxiolytics. In Anxiolytics: Neurochemical, Behavioral and Clinical Perspectives (ed. Malick, J. B.Enna, S. J. and Yamamura, H. I.). Raven Press: New York.

What do the neurosciences tell us about anxiety disorders? A comment1

  • Isaac Marks and Adolf Tobeña

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed