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Childhood interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and atopic disorders as risk factors for hypomanic symptoms in young adulthood: a longitudinal birth cohort study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 January 2017

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Abstract

Type
Corrigendum
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

The authors would like to apologise for a numerical mistake in the abstract and table 3 of the above mentioned article.

In the abstract of the article, paragraph ‘After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic status, past psychological and behavioural problems, body mass index and maternal postnatal depression, participants in the top third of IL-6 values at 9 years, compared with the bottom third, had an increased risk of hypomanic symptoms by age 22 years [adjusted odds ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–2.85, p < 0.001]. Higher IL-6 levels in childhood were associated with adult hypomania features in a dose–response fashion. After further adjustment for depression at the age of 18 years this association remained (adjusted odds ratio 1.70, 95% CI 1.03–2.81, p = 0.038). There was no evidence of an association of hypomanic symptoms with CRP levels, asthma or eczema in childhood’.

Should read:

‘After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic status, past psychological and behavioural problems, body mass index and maternal postnatal depression, participants in the top third of IL-6 values at 9 years, compared with the bottom third, had an increased risk of hypomanic symptoms by age 22 years [adjusted odds ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–2.85, p = 0.018]. Higher IL-6 levels in childhood were associated with adult hypomania features in a dose–response fashion. After further adjustment for depression at the age of 18 years this association remained (adjusted odds ratio 1.70, 95% CI 1.03–2.81, p = 0.038). There was no evidence of an association of hypomanic symptoms with CRP levels, asthma or eczema in childhood’.

Table 3

Table 3. Serum IL-6 and CRP tertiles at age 9 years and the odds of hypomania aged 22 years

Should read:

Table 3. Serum IL-6 and CRP tertiles at age 9 years and the odds of hypomania aged 22 years

References

Hayes, JF, Khandaker, GM, Anderson, J, Mackay, D, Zammit, S, Lewis, G, Smith, DJ and Osborn, DPJ (2016). ‘Childhood interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and atopic disorders as risk factors for hypomanic symptoms in young adulthood: a longitudinal birth cohort study’. Psychological Medicine, 111. doi:10.1017/S0033291716001574 Google Scholar

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