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1. On Steam-Pressure Thermometers of Sulphurous Acid, Water, and Mercury

  • W. Thomson

Extract

The first annexed diagram represents a thermometer constructed to show absolute temperature realised for the case of water and vapour of water as thermometric substance. The containing vessel consists of a tube with cylindric bulb like an ordinary thermometer; but, unlike an ordinary thermometer, the tube is bent in the manner shown in the drawing. The tube may be of from 1 to 2 or 3 millims. bore, and the cylindrical part of the bulb of about ten times as much. The length of the cylindrical part of the bulb may be rather more than of the length of the straight part of the tube. The contents, water and vapour of water, are to be put in and the glass hermetically sealed to enclose them, with the utmost precautions to obtain pure water as thoroughly freed from air as possible, after better than the best manner of instrument makers in making cryophoruses and water hammers. The quantity of water left in at the sealing must be enough to fill the cylindrical part of the bulb and the horizontal branch of the tube. When in use the straight part of the tube must be vertical with its closed end up, and the part of it occupied by the manometric water-column must be kept at a nearly enough definite temperature by a surrounding glass jacket-tube of ice-water.

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1 Practically, the best ordinary chemical means of preparing sulphurous acid, as from sulphuric acid, by heating with copper, might be adopted in preference to burning sulphur.

1. On Steam-Pressure Thermometers of Sulphurous Acid, Water, and Mercury

  • W. Thomson

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