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The pathological effects of ultraviolet radiation on the epidermis of teleost fish with reference to the solar radiation effect in higher animals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

Alistair M. Bullock
Affiliation:
Dunstaffnage Marine Research Laboratory, Oban, Argyll
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Synopsis

The general epidermal morphology of teleost fish is described and comparison made in terms of its vulnerability to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) with that of the human. Whereas human skin has a natural pigmentary photoprotective (tanning) mechanism within its epidermis, in teleosts the protective pigment layer is located primarily within the upper dermis. The potential impact of solar UV on farmed fish is discussed both in relation to water penetration of UVR and the phenomenon of photosensitisation, a condition common in higher animals and which has now been shown to induce skin lesions in fish. The results of recent investigations into photosensitisation in fish are described.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 1982

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References

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