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Furunculosis—an old problem facing a new industry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

A. L. S. Munro
Affiliation:
Marine Laboratory, Victoria Road, Aberdeen
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Synopsis

Furunculosis has caused serious economic losses in some Atlantic salmon farms in Scotland. It is considered that the disease has the potential to be a significant economic problem to the whole industry unless control measures are adopted. When salmon in a farmed population carry the disease agent in non-clinical form the bacterium has low to intermediate virulence, but in stocks with recurring clinical disease, virulence is apparently increased. The significance of these observations is discussed in terms of the major methods of control, namely avoidance, husbandry procedures, chemotherapy, vaccines and statutory controls.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 1982

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References

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