Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Sensory evaluation of polyphenol-rich millet-based muffins and their effect on in vitro starch digestion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 December 2017

A. Almaski
Affiliation:
Functional Food Centre, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP
S. Coe
Affiliation:
Functional Food Centre, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP
H. Lightowler
Affiliation:
Functional Food Centre, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP
S. Thondre
Affiliation:
Functional Food Centre, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford OX3 0BP
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article
Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2017 

Millet is a functional grain that has attracted interest for many years and has a unique position among other cereals due to its high content of polyphenols, antioxidants and dietary fibre( Reference Amadou, Gounga and Le 1 ). It has been found that the digestion, absorption and metabolism of both starch and sucrose can be affected by polyphenols and their metabolites( Reference Hithamani and Srinivasan 2 ). Furthermore, polyphenols have been shown to reduce the sugar release from foods that are rich in carbohydrates( Reference Coe, Fraser and Ryan 3 ).

Sensory analysis of new products plays a significant role in food choices. The increasing demand for new and healthy bakery products has resulted in a new market for alternative ingredients. The addition of millet grain to existing baked products is a simple and appropriate way of enhancing their nutritional value to provide health benefits( Reference Lizia and John 4 ).

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polyphenol-rich millet-based muffins on in vitro starch digestion and to conduct a sensory principles test to assess their overall acceptance.

Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the in vitro starch digestion of selected millet-based muffins and analyse reducing sugar using the 3,5-Dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) colorimetric method( Reference Coe, Fraser and Ryan 3 ). Descriptive sensory evaluation of millet-based muffins was conducted in 30 healthy volunteers (19 female and 11 male) by scoring different attributes using a 9-point hedonic scale.

These results show that there was a reduction in sugar release in all three millet-based muffins compared to a wheat based muffin (control) (Table 1). The control muffin and finger millet flour-based muffins showed a significantly higher rapidly digested starch (RDS) compared to the grain-based muffins (finger millet and kodo millet; p < 0·05). Figure 1 shows that the control muffin and muffins made with finger millet flour and grain were significantly more acceptable compared to muffins made with kodo millet grain. The overall acceptance was significantly different (p = 0·005) between kodo millet grain-based muffins and finger millet-based muffins in both forms. The results of this study provides valuable data for using millet in baked products which can result in increased utilization of millet and production of nutritious baked products to consume as part of the daily diet.

Fig. 1. Spider graph showing sensory analysis data for millet based muffins

Table 1. Rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and slowly digestible starch (SDS) in control muffins and different types and forms of millet-based muffins

* Significance level p < 0·05.

RDS = sugar released after 20 min of digestion.

SDS = sugar released between 20 and 120 min of digestion.

References

1. Amadou, I, Gounga, M & Le, G (2013) Emir J Food Agric 25, 501508.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Hithamani, G & Srinivasan, K (2014) Food Chem 164, 5562.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Coe, S, Fraser, A & Ryan, L (2013) Int J Food Sci 6.Google Scholar
4. Lizia, S & John, S (2014) IJSR 3, 23197064.Google Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 34
Total number of PDF views: 182 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 11th December 2017 - 24th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-rm8z7 Total loading time: 0.421 Render date: 2021-01-24T21:53:19.741Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Sensory evaluation of polyphenol-rich millet-based muffins and their effect on in vitro starch digestion
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Sensory evaluation of polyphenol-rich millet-based muffins and their effect on in vitro starch digestion
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Sensory evaluation of polyphenol-rich millet-based muffins and their effect on in vitro starch digestion
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *