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Plasma heating in the initial phase of solar flares

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2010

P. Rudawy
Affiliation:
Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, 51-622 Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11, Poland email: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl; falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl
M. Siarkowski
Affiliation:
Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622 Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11, Poland email: ms@cbk.pan.wroc.pl
R. Falewicz
Affiliation:
Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, 51-622 Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11, Poland email: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl; falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl
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Abstract

In this paper we analyze soft and hard X-ray emission of the 2002 September 20 M1.8 GOES class solar flare observed by RHESSI and GOES satellites, where soft X-ray emission precedes the onset of the main bulk hard X-ray emission by ~5 min. This suggests that an additional heating mechanism may be at work at the early beginning of the flare. However RHESSI spectra indicate presence of the non-thermal electrons also before impulsive phase. So, we assumed that a dominant energy transport mechanism during rise phase of solar flares is electron beam-driven evaporation. We used non-thermal electron beams derived from RHESSI spectra as the heating source in a hydrodynamic model of the analyzed flare. We showed that energy delivered by non-thermal electron beams is sufficient to heat the flare loop to temperatures in which it emits soft X-ray closely following the GOES 1–8 Å light-curve.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2010

References

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