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The 6dFGS peculiar velocity field

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2013

Christopher M. Springob
Affiliation:
International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, Australia email: christopher.springob@icrar.org ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics Australian Astronomical Observatory
Christina Magoulas
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne, Australia
Matthew Colless
Affiliation:
Australian Astronomical Observatory
D. Heath Jones
Affiliation:
Monash University, Australia
Lachlan Campbell
Affiliation:
University of Western Kentucky, USA
John Lucey
Affiliation:
University of Durham, UK
Jeremy Mould
Affiliation:
Swinburne University, Australia
Pirin Erdoğdu
Affiliation:
University College London, UK
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Abstract

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The 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS) is an all-southern-sky galaxy survey, including 125,000 redshifts and a Fundamental Plane (FP) subsample of 10,000 peculiar velocities. This makes 6dFGS the largest peculiar-velocity sample to date. We have fitted the FP with a tri-variate Gaussian model using a maximum-likelihood approach, and derive the Bayesian probability distribution of the peculiar velocity for each of the 10,000 galaxies. We fit models of the velocity field, including comparisons to the field predicted from the redshift-survey density field, to derive the values of the redshift-space distortion parameter β, the bulk flow and the residual bulk flow in excess of that predicted from the density field. We compare these results to those derived by other authors and discuss the cosmological implications.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2013

References

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